Argentine Tango School

"La clavada", Argentine Tango music sheet cover.

“La clavada” by Juan D’Arienzo y su Orquesta Típica, 1940.

“La clavada” by Juan D’Arienzo y su Orquesta Típica, 1940.

Ernesto Zambonini

Violinist and composer (6 April 1880 – 23 April 1947)

He was violinist in many groups of his time.

We can recall his tenure with Vicente Greco, with a trio along with Eduardo Arolas and Rafael Tuegols, in the Firpo’s orchestra, in the one led by Tano Genaro (with Juan Carlos Cobián on piano), with Manuel Aróztegui and in other forgotten aggregations.

Francisco Canaro who did not use to speak badly of his old pals, and to whom Zambonini, together with Félix Camurano, dedicated the tango, did not refrained himself of describing negatively his personality: «He had the habit of getting drunk and when he was in that state he became an impertinent man and an extremely aggressive person» and his words are quoted because among his stories one that took place in La Boca is mentioned. An orchestra of Italian players was playing at a venue and for some reason, probably alcoholic drinks, he forced them to play for hours only his tango “La clavada”. We guess that the imposition may have been due to a convincing menace.

Ernesto Zambonini was one of the creators of the “canyengue” beat with the violin.

Read more about Ernesto Zambonini at www.todotango.com

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We are happy to have a collaboration with the people from tangotunes.com from whom some of you may have heard, they do high-quality transfers from original tango shellacs.

It is the number 1 source for professional Tango DJs all over the world.

  • Now they started a new project that addresses the dancers and the website is https://en.mytango.online
    You will find two compilations at the beginning, one tango and one vals compilation in amazing quality.
    The price is 50€ each (for 32 songs each compilation) and now the good news!

If you enter the promo code 8343 when you register at this site you will get a 20% discount!

Thanks for supporting this project, you will find other useful information on the site, a great initiative.

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"Canaro", Argentine Tango music sheet cover.

“Canaro” by Juan D’Arienzo y su Orquesta Típica, 1941.

“Canaro” by Juan D’Arienzo y su Orquesta Típica, 1941.

José Martínez

Musician and composer (28 January 1890 – 27 July 1939)

Without having studied music, he played by ear, and yet he was a very good instrumentalist and a better composer; as he did not know how to write them, his creations were put on paper by other musicians, among whom were Eduardo Arolas, Augusto Berto, Agustín Bardi, and Francisco Canaro.

He was greatly intuitive and learned to play the piano by watching his friends play.

He even left the music on several occasions to work as a salaryman in different companies, such as the cereal companies Bunge & Born, Dreyfus, and in a notary’s office.
 
His professional career began in 1911, with a trio formed with Augusto Berto on bandoneon and Julio Doutry on violin.
He used to invent the melody of his compositions by improvising during his concerts.

Read more about José Martínez and the History of Tango

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"El pensamiento", Argentine Tango music sheet cover.

“El pensamiento” by Juan D’Arienzo y su Orquesta Típica, 1945.

“El pensamiento” by Juan D’Arienzo y su Orquesta Típica, 1945.

José Martínez

Pianist leader and composer (28 January 1890 – 27 July 1939)

Without having studied music, he played by ear, and yet he was a very good instrumentalist and a better composer; as he did not know how to write them, his creations were put on paper by other musicians, among which were Eduardo Arolas, Augusto Berto, Agustín Bardi, and Francisco Canaro.

He was greatly intuitive, who learned to play the piano by watching his friends play.

He even left the music on several occasions to work as a salaryman in different companies, such as Bunge & Born, Dreyfus, and in a notary’s office.

His professional career began in 1911, with a trio formed with Augusto Berto on bandoneon and Julio Doutry on violin.

He used to make up the melody of his compositions improvising during his concerts.

At one point he joined a group with Francisco Canaro, who brought him his first work “Pura uva” to paper.

Once he had gained experience, playing in cafeterias in La Boca, he was summoned by Eduardo Arolas to fill the place left vacant by none other than Agustín Bardi.

In this period, Arolas would be in charge of the transcription of his compositions.

Read more about José Martínez and the History of Tango

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Cayetano Puglisi at Juan D'Arienzo Orchestra playing Argentine Tango.

“La bicoca” by Juan D’Arienzo y su Orquesta Típica, 1940.

“La bicoca” by Juan D’Arienzo y su Orquesta Típica, 1940.

Cayetano Puglisi at Juan D'Arienzo Orchestra playing Argentine Tango.

Cayetano Puglisi

Violinist, leader and composer (2 January 1902 – 2 November 1968)

In 1940, the orchestra of Juan D’Arienzo disbanded in Montevideo.

All his musicians reunited under the leadership of Juan Polito, immediately hired by LR2 Radio Argentina.

Anxiously, D’Arienzo looked for members to put together a new orchestra, tempting Cayetano Puglisi with an offer.

He agreed to it, and with the pianist Fulvio SalamancaHéctor Varela, and the singer Alberto Reynal, before the mid-1940, D’Arienzo returned to Radio El Mundo amid great expectations, managing to keep his style.

His violin sounds marvelous. 

Read more about Cayetano Puglisi at www.todotango.com

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"Tucumán" by Juan D'Arienzo, vinyl disc.

“Tucumán” by Juan D’Arienzo y su Orquesta Típica, 1950.

“Tucumán” by Juan D’Arienzo y su Orquesta Típica, 1950.

José Luis Padula

Guitarist, pianist, composer and leader (30 October 1893 – 12 June 1945)

José Luis Padula was born in Tucumán, and to this city, he dedicated a tango.

He was naturally gifted, having a clean style full of rhythm and suggestions when on the piano he played tangos. 

Padula composed many remarkable numbers.

Among them, the tango “Tucumán” that D’Arienzo recorded.

Read more about José Luis Padula at www.todotango.com

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