Emilio and Osvaldo Fresedo, argentine Tango musicians, lyricists, leaders and composers.

“Por qué” by Osvaldo Pugliese y su Orquesta Típica with Roberto Chanel and Alberto Morán in vocals, 1945.

“Por qué” by Osvaldo Pugliese y su Orquesta Típica with Roberto Chanel and Alberto Morán in vocals, 1945.

Emilio and Osvaldo Fresedo, argentine Tango musicians, lyricists, leaders and composers.

Emilio Fresedo

Violinist, lyricist and composer (5 March 1893 – 10 February 1974)

His lyrics possess great expressive achievements and reached great popular acclaim.

Born in Buenos Aires, he was a man of various activities: violinist in small groups together with his brother Osvaldo Nicolás; journalist in the newspaper; co-director of a magazine; advertising promoter and even producer of medical specialties.

His early tango lyrics date back to the years when he worked as journalist.

Read more about Emilio Fresedo at www.todotango.com

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We are happy to have a collaboration with the people from tangotunes.com from whom some of you may have heard, they do hi-quality transfers from original tango shellacs.

It is the number 1 source for professional Tango DJs all over the world.

  • Now they started a new project that address the dancers and the website is https://en.mytango.online
    You will find two compilations at the beginning, one tango and one vals compilation in an amazing quality.
    The price is 50€ each (for 32 songs each compilation) and now the good news!

If you enter the promo code 8343 when you register at this site you will get a 20% discount!

Thanks for supporting this project, you will find other useful information on the site, a great initiative.

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"La abandoné y no sabía", Argentine Tango music sheet page.

“La abandoné y no sabía” by Osvaldo Pugliese y su Orquesta Típica with Roberto Chanel in vocals, 1944.

“La abandoné y no sabía” by Osvaldo Pugliese y su Orquesta Típica with Roberto Chanel in vocals, 1944.

José Canet

Guitar player, leader, composer and lyricist (15 December 1915 – 10 March 1984)

His style was deeply rooted and directly based on the classic guitar groups.

On many of his performances, he added to the guitar trio or quartet other string instruments: contrabass, violins, and violoncello.

His vocation awakened at age twelve.

He made tours of many countries in Latin America.

In Cuba, his success was amazing, with a lot of journeys and a great number of recordings.

During one of those tours, Canet composed one of his most famous tangos: “La abandoné y no sabía”, in Chile in 1943.

He was a prolific composer.

Read more about José Canet at www.todotango.com

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"Galleguita", Argentine Tango music sheet cover.

“Galleguita” by Osvaldo Pugliese y su Orquesta Típica with Roberto Chanel in vocals, 1945.

“Galleguita” by Osvaldo Pugliese y su Orquesta Típica with Roberto Chanel in vocals, 1945.

Alfredo Navarrine

Lyricist, singer, composer, actor and guitarist (8 December 1894 – 15 April 1979)

Singer, guitar player, author, and actor, Alfredo Navarrine was born in Buenos Aires (San Cristóbal neighborhood) on December 8, 1894.

He got to work in the best companies, on the best stages and also in cabarets.

With his fame, he entered broadcasting where he participated in relevant programs doing radio soap operas and criollo arts.

He was a good friend of Carlos Gardel.

He composed a large number of songs.

Read more about Alfredo Navarrine at www.todotango.com

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Osvaldo Pugliese, Anibal Troilo, Floreal Ruiz, Ricardo Tanturi, and other Argentine Tango artists.

“Amiga” by Osvaldo Pugliese y su Orquesta Típica with Roberto Chanel in vocals, 1947.

“Amiga” by Osvaldo Pugliese y su Orquesta Típica with Roberto Chanel in vocals, 1947.

Osvaldo Pugliese, Anibal Troilo, Floreal Ruiz, Ricardo Tanturi, and other Argentine Tango artists.

Osvaldo Pugliese

Pianist, leader, composer. (2 December 1905 – 25 July 1995)

His definitive projection towards the tango he conceived commenced on August 11, 1939, when he reappeared at the café Nacional. 

Pugliese was the leader, pianist, and arranger of a group which this time was working as a cooperative society.

From a café placed in the Villa Crespo neighborhood, they switched to the most important broadcast of the time, Radio El Mundo, so giving origin to an important group of followers made up of fans of his style and adepts of the Communist party.

Of the greatest importance was, when his orchestra finally recorded in 1943, the arrival of Roberto Chanel, tough singer, with nasal sound and compadrito style, who left 31 recordings.

For many years, Osvaldo Pugliese’s orchestra was banned for broadcasting as a means of political censorship but it did not succeed in diminishing his popular acceptance.

More Osvaldo Pugliese recordings

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Roberto Chanel, Argentine Tango singer and composer.

“Fuimos” by Osvaldo Pugliese y su Orquesta Típica with Roberto Chanel in vocals, 1946.

“Fuimos” by Osvaldo Pugliese y su Orquesta Típica with Roberto Chanel in vocals, 1946.

Roberto Chanel, Argentine Tango singer and composer.

Roberto Chanel

Singer, composer and lyricist (26 November 1914 – 24 July 1972)

He was an excellent singer, delicate, with a warm tenderness, a typical symbol of his period.

With Pugliese, he recorded 31 tunes, among those which stand out we like to share today “Fuimos”.

For the connoisseurs, he was the best Pugliese’s vocalist, the one who best and with the highest finesse represented the maestro.

With his nasal sound, his canyengue, and his common man’s diction he kept alive the popular roots that gave rise to tango music.

It was Chanel who identified himself as an orchestra instrument, in the manner of a viola, as can be verified since his first recording.

Read more about Roberto Chanel at www.todotango.com

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