Police notice sign

“Cacareando” by Orquesta Típica Victor with Carlos Lafuente in vocals, 1933.

“Cacareando” by Orquesta Típica Victor with Carlos Lafuente in vocals, 1933.

Police notice sign.

The first milongueros

The names of the first Tango dancers milongueros are not in a book on the history of Tango but in police records.

In a newspaper from 1862, it is read that Daniel Molina, Feliciano Orsine, Rufino Olguín, and José Sandoval, with the women Catalina Barsolo and Francisca Díaz, were imprisoned at the police station for dancing with “cortes y quebradas”… which was forbidden.

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Adolfo Carabelli, Argentine Tango musician.

“Tomala con soda” by Adolfo Carabelli y su Orquesta Típica with Carlos Lafuente in vocals, 1933.

“Tomala con soda” by Adolfo Carabelli y su Orquesta Típica with Carlos Lafuente in vocals, 1933.

Adolfo Carabelli, Argentine Tango musician.

Adolfo Carabelli

Pianist, composer and leader (8 September 1893 – 25 January 1947)

The real amplitude of Carabelli’s capacity is evidenced as from 1926 when Victor hired him as artistic director of the label, and at the same time commissioned him to form an orchestra which would play either jazz or tango music.

Thanks to Carabelli, since then the Victor staff reached a higher hierarchy, achieving the inclusion of notable musicians and choosing an attractive repertoire.

Among the best well-known tangos of his tango orchestra (orquesta típica) is “Tomala con soda”.

Read more about Adolfo Carabelli at www.todotango.com

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Agesilao Ferrazzano, Argentine Tango musician.

“Vivorita” by Agesilao Ferrazzano y su Orquesta Típica, 1927.

“Vivorita” by Agesilao Ferrazzano y su Orquesta Típica, 1927.

Agesilao Ferrazzano, Argentine Tango musician.

Agesilao Ferrazzano

Violinist, leader and composer (31 July 1897 – 18 January 1980)

He was a tango violinist with a very personal style born in Buenos Aires by the end of the nineteenth century.

His first professional engagement was with the Roberto Firpo Orchestra in which he made his debut as second violin, when the lead and only violinist was Tito Roccatagliata. This was back in 1914.

Our chronology places us in 1927. Agesilao formed a new orchestra to perform at the cabaret Florida and signed a recording contract until October. In November he again traveled to Europe from Buenos Aires.

It is known that he heavily worked in Europe as member of different orchestras but he never returned to Buenos Aires. 

Read more about Agesilao Ferrazzano at www.todotango.com

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Elvino Vardaro, Argentine Tango musician, leader and composer.

“Llevátelo todo” by Elvino Vardaro and Luis Petrucelli Orquesta Típica, 1928.

“Llevátelo todo” by Elvino Vardaro and Luis Petrucelli Orquesta Típica, 1928.

Elvino Vardaro, Argentine Tango musician, leader and composer.

Elvino Vardaro

Violinist, leader and composer (18 June 1905 – 5 August 1971)

Luis Adolfo Sierra made the following description of his style:

«With perfect intonation, he completely mastered his instrument and the resources of playing; with a deep knowledge of all the secrets of the violin mechanism.

He always showcased an impeccable dexterity when handling the bow and a facility with the left hand which allowed him to reach the highest notes naturally.

He embellished his phrasings with the addition of subtle turns and grace notes of precise execution.

He had an unmistakable vibrato and romantic lyricism in all his interpretations.

Remarkable personality to the point that his unmistakable sound made, unintentionally, always his performance outstanding at any of the so many violin sections he joined.

In spite of the fact that he never intended a personal showcasing, his presence was always evidenced.

Even though, in essence, he was a product of the Decarean school, his violin style was totally different from Julio De Caro’s.»

Read more about Elvino Vardaro at www.todotango.com

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Carlos Gardel & Alfredo Lepera, Argentine Tango music.

“Carillón de La Merced” by Orquesta Típica Victor with Ernesto Famá in vocals, 1931.

“Carillón de La Merced” by Orquesta Típica Victor with Ernesto Famá in vocals, 1931.

Carlos Gardel & Alfredo Le Pera, Argentine Tango music.

Alfredo Le Pera

Poet, lyricist, journalist, playwright and cinema script writer. (7 June 1900 – 24 June 1935)

In his lyrics Le Pera tried to use a language that would be understood by all the Spanish-speaking world.

Then widening, in that way, the geography of tango.

In fact, Gardel, with his mimicry, broke the barriers of the language. Like every great interpreter, his language was universal.

However, in spite of that we cannot underestimate Le Pera’s contribution, who, by launching the singer beyond the closed localism which surrounded the poetry of tango, he helped his friend by making easier his road to a vast conquest.

Read more about Alfredo Le Pera at www.todotango.com

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