Tag: tango music

Ricardo Tanturi, Argentine Tango musician, leader and composer, and medical doctor.

“La vida es corta” by Ricardo Tanturi y su Orquesta Típica with Alberto Castillo in vocals, 1941.

Ricardo Tanturi, Argentine Tango musician, leader and composer, and medical doctor.Ricardo Tanturi

Pianist, leader, and composer.
(27 January 1905 – 24 January 1973)

Tanturi’s great success would come in 1939 when he incorporated Alberto Castillo, a great attraction for the public.

Castillo, with his perfect tune, master ability in the use of pitches and mezza voce, seduced the audience in many possible ways: with his exaggerated gestures, his masculine elegance, and neat hairstyle, his gynecologist degree (obtained in 1942), and that sometimes intimate sometimes lively mood, all of which made a show of each and every tango.

In all the 37 songs recorded by Castillo before leaving Tanturi in 1943, the orchestra let him play the leading role as it also did with the singer chosen to replace him, the Uruguayan Enrique Campos. The same as Castillo, Campos was concerned with communicating with the public, making no attempts to display his vocal skills. He sang in an indifferent, unexcited, simple fashion. Behind him, the orchestra sounded self-confident, precise, and discreet, with a plain perfection. All this turned the 51 songs recorded by Tanturi-Campos into one of the treasuries of the genre.

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Ernesto Ponzio, Argentine Tango musician and composer.

“Don Juan” by Juan D’Arienzo y su Orquesta Típica, 1936.

“Don Juan” by Juan D’Arienzo y su Orquesta Típica, 1936.

Ernesto Ponzio, Argentine Tango musician and composer.

Ernesto Ponzio

Violinist and composer (10 July 1885 – 21 October 1934)

A porteño, born in that neighborhood called Tierra del Fuego (located between the demolished Penitentiary and La Recoleta).

Because of his father’s death, Ernesto had to interrupt his violin studies at the conservatory.

His household, in need of resources, anticipated the beginning of his performances.

Inns and bars were his first venues.

After his playing he, resolute and joyously, paraded with a small saucer in his hand to collect the money that would help his poor family’s income.

We found out that the well-known tango “Don Juan (El taita del barrio)” was, apparently, written in 1898.

According to different authors it was premiered at the dancehall run by Concepción Amaya, Mamita, Lavalle 2177, around 1900.

Read more about Ernesto Ponzio at www.todotango.com

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Alberto Amor. Argentine music at Escuela de Tango de Buenos Aires.

“Flor de Montserrat” by Rodolfo Biagi y su Orquesta Típica with Alberto Amor in vocals, 1945.

“Flor de Montserrat” by Rodolfo Biagi y su Orquesta Típica with Alberto Amor in vocals, 1945.

Alberto Amor, Argentine Tango singer.

Alberto Amor

Singer and lyricist (25 January 1917 – 1999)

He was a great singer not only because of his interpretive quality but also for his personal voice and phrasing.

His best period was when he sang with Rodolfo Biagi, an orchestra that had its followers but which was not among the most acclaimed.

However, by listening to his recordings, we can appraise his baritone range with tenor-like overtones and the balance with which he collocated his voice that, despite its strength, achieved a gentle and delicate result.

He was a great singer that we shall go on enjoying by means of his magnificent recordings.

Read more about Alberto Amor at www.todotango.com

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"Milonguero viejo", Argentine Tango music sheet cover.

“Milonguero viejo” by Carlos Di Sarli y su Orquesta Típica, 1944.

“Milonguero viejo” by Carlos Di Sarli y su Orquesta Típica, 1944.

Carlos Di Sarli

Pianist, leader and composer (7 January 1903 – 12 January 1960)

In his orchestral scheme there were not instrumental solos, the bandoneon section sang at times the melody, but it had an essentially rhythmic and danceable role.

He was a talented pianist, maybe one of the most important, who conducted his orchestra from his instrument, with which he mastered the synchrony and the performance of the outfit.

Only the violin was showcased in an extremely delicate way, on a brief solo or on a counter melody.

“Milonguero viejo (Fresedo)”, the tango he dedicated to Fresedo, his referent and admired friend, is curiously the paradoxical lapsus that portrays his own musical model.

Read and listen more about Carlos Di Sarli

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Roberto Rufino, Argentine Tango singer and composer.

“Mañana zarpa un barco” by Carlos Di Sarli y su Orquesta Típica with Roberto Rufino in vocals, 1942.

“Mañana zarpa un barco” by Carlos Di Sarli y su Orquesta Típica with Roberto Rufino in vocals, 1942.

Roberto Rufino, Argentine Tango singer and composer.

Roberto Rufino

Singer and composer (6 January 1922 – 24 February 1999)

Listening to Roberto Rufino when he sang any of the tangos he had chosen for his repertoire, was to realize that that tango was unraveling little by little and that the words sprang up separately, without forsaking the whole that gathered them, with the proper strength they had to have in their context.

Rufino was that: a storyteller, a phraser, an interpreter that perfectly knew which was the meaning of what he was singing.

Fame had already touched him with its magic wand and at the age of 21 or 22, he had an unprecedented discographic record.

In fact, he recorded, together with Di Sarli, forty-six numbers.

Read more about Roberto Rufino at www.todotango.com

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