Argentine Tango School

Tag: tango music

"Milonguero viejo", Argentine Tango music sheet cover.

“Milonguero viejo” by Carlos Di Sarli y su Orquesta Típica, 1944.

“Milonguero viejo” by Carlos Di Sarli y su Orquesta Típica, 1944.

Carlos Di Sarli

Pianist, leader and composer (7 January 1903 – 12 January 1960)

In his orchestral scheme there were not instrumental solos, the bandoneon section sang at times the melody, but it had an essentially rhythmic and danceable role.

He was a talented pianist, maybe one of the most important, who conducted his orchestra from his instrument, with which he mastered the synchrony and the performance of the outfit.

Only the violin was showcased in an extremely delicate way, on a brief solo or on a counter melody.

“Milonguero viejo (Fresedo)”, the tango he dedicated to Fresedo, his referent and admired friend, is curiously the paradoxical lapsus that portrays his own musical model.

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Roberto Rufino, Argentine Tango singer and composer.

“Mañana zarpa un barco” by Carlos Di Sarli y su Orquesta Típica with Roberto Rufino in vocals, 1942.

“Mañana zarpa un barco” by Carlos Di Sarli y su Orquesta Típica with Roberto Rufino in vocals, 1942.

Roberto Rufino, Argentine Tango singer and composer.

Roberto Rufino

Singer and composer (6 January 1922 – 24 February 1999)

Listening to Roberto Rufino when he sang any of the tangos he had chosen for his repertoire, was to realize that that tango was unraveling little by little and that the words sprang up separately, without forsaking the whole that gathered them, with the proper strength they had to have in their context.

Rufino was that: a storyteller, a phraser, an interpreter that perfectly knew which was the meaning of what he was singing.

Fame had already touched him with its magic wand and at the age of 21 or 22, he had an unprecedented discographic record.

In fact, he recorded, together with Di Sarli, forty-six numbers.

Read more about Roberto Rufino at www.todotango.com

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"Jirón porteño", Argentine Tango music sheet cover.

“Jirón porteño” by Alfredo De Ángelis y su Orquesta Típica with Julio Martel in vocals, 1946.

“Jirón porteño” by Alfredo De Ángelis y su Orquesta Típica with Julio Martel in vocals, 1946.

Julio Navarrine

Lyricist, composer, singer and actor (20 December 1889 – 11 March 1966)

He wrote a good number of tango lyrics.

In “Oro muerto” (later its title was changed to “Jirón porteño”), this singular promoter of Argentine popular music achieved a beautiful and genuine suburb vignette.

It is his most transcendent work.

Read more about Julio Navarrine at www.todotango.com

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Pablo Podestá, Argentine Tango singer, guitarist, composer and actor.

“Pablo” by Anibal Troilo y su Orquesta Típica, 1943.

“Pablo” by Anibal Troilo y su Orquesta Típica, 1943.

Pablo Podestá

Singer, guitarist, composer and actor (22 November 1875 – 26 April 1923)

He was the younger brother of the Podestá, the great artistic family directed by José Podestá (Don Pepe or Pepino 88), founder of the Argentine theater.

Since childhood he learned all the secrets of the circus and at age eight he was already spoiled by the public for his acrobatic exhibits.

When his brother and guide, Pepe, decided to form a company, he became an actor, and when he managed to make a name for himself he formed his own, premiering in his long career the best dramas of Florencio Sánchez and other great Argentine authors of the time.

Those who saw him act assured that he had no rival on the scene and always remembered him as the greatest of our actors.

José Martinez composed this tango in his homage.

Read more at www.todotango.com

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"El irresistible", Argentine Tango music sheet cover.

“El irresistible” by Juan D’Arienzo y su Orquesta Típica, 1936.

“El irresistible” by Juan D’Arienzo y su Orquesta Típica, 1936.

Lorenzo Logatti

Clarinetist and composer (7 November 1872 – 19 March 1961)

He was born in Foggia, Italy, and was a clarinetist and composer. His father, a professional musician, taught him his first lessons. Later, he continued his studies with other teachers and joined bands and orchestras in his province and also in Naples. He even led a band in Ancona.

During the carnival dances at the Teatro Ópera, he premiered in 1908 his tango “El irresistible”.

At that time the repercussion in the audience was so important that a pair of dancing partners —according to a story— approached the bandstand in order to know its title. It was the female dancer who asked about it.

When the bandleader pointed out at a musician saying he was the composer of the tune, the latter answered that he had not yet given a title to the piece.

Then she added:
– But it’s irresistible!!!
– That’s it, that’ll be its title…

Read more about Lorenzo Logatti at www.todotango.com

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