Tag: history

Juan Larenza, Argentine Tango musician and composer.

“Para qué te quiero tanto” by Carlos Di Sarli y su Orquesta Típica with Jorge Durán in vocals, 1946.

“Para qué te quiero tanto” by Carlos Di Sarli y su Orquesta Típica with Jorge Durán in vocals, 1946.

Juan Larenza, Argentine Tango musician and composer.

Juan Larenza

Pianist and composer (8 July 1911 – 17 February 1980)

Inspired and prolific composer, he was born in Buenos Aires City.

On his fourteenth birthday his parents surprised him with the gift of a piano.

Even though a cousin of his volunteered to teach him his early exercises he was an intuitive musician and had no need of teachings.

He was self-taught and also in composing.

Among his many compositions we can mention “Para qué te quiero tanto”, with lyrics written by Cátulo Castillo.

Read more about Juan Larenza at www.todotango.com

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Charlo, Argentine Tango singer and composer.

“Rondando tu esquina” by Ángel D’Agostino y su Orquesta Típica with Ángel Vargas in vocals, 1945.

“Rondando tu esquina” by Ángel D’Agostino y su Orquesta Típica with Ángel Vargas in vocals, 1945.

Charlo, Argentine Tango singer and composer.

Charlo

Singer, musician, pianist, actor and composer. (7 July 1906 – 30 October 1990)

In 1928, his profuse presence on record for the label Odeon began not only with Francisco Canaro‘s or Francisco Lomuto’s orchestras —both very popular—,but also with guitars. In his abundant discography with Canaro (more than half a thousand songs until 1931) singer and orchestra alternate protagonism.

From his important work as composer, of rare ability to musically express human drama and romantic rapture, “Rondando tu esquina”, with lyrics by Enrique Cadícamo, stands out.

 

Read more about Charlo at www.todotango.com

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"Qué lento corre el tren" by Enrique Rodriguez y su Orquesta Típica with Armando Moreno in vocals, 1943. Music: Alfredo De Angelis. Lyrics: Carmelo Volpe.

“Qué lento corre el tren” by Enrique Rodriguez y su Orquesta Típica with Armando Moreno in vocals, 1943.

“Qué lento corre el tren” by Enrique Rodriguez y su Orquesta Típica with Armando Moreno in vocals, 1943.

Writer, poet and playwright, Carmelo Volpe was born in Buenos Aires on July 5, 1909 and died on March 18, 1967.

Carmelo Volpe

Lyricist (5 July 1909 – 18 March 1967)

Writer, poet and playwright, Carmelo Volpe was born in Buenos Aires on July 5, 1909 and died on March 18, 1967.

Author of the lyrics of well-known musical pieces such as “A una mujer”, waltz with music by Horacio Salgán; “Cortada de San Ignacio” milonga with music by Horacio Salgán; “Moreno de los morenos” with music by Enrique Maciel, among many others.

In 1940 he was awarded by Radio Belgrano for his work “El intruso” which was performed in the Modern Theater of this capital by the company of Iris Marga under the direction of Alberto Ballerini.

Read more about Carmelo Volpe at www.todotango.com

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Oscar Larroca, Argentine Tango singer.

“Flor de fango” by Alfredo De Angelis y su Orquesta Típica with Oscar Larroca in vocals, 1951.

“Flor de fango” by Alfredo De Angelis y su Orquesta Típica with Oscar Larroca in vocals, 1951.

Oscar Larroca, Argentine Tango singer.

Oscar Larroca

Singer (5 July 1922 – 26 August 1976)

The violinist of Alfredo De Angelis, attracted by the color of his baritone-like voice, his good intonation and his diction, plus his good-looking appearance, introduced him to De Angelis who hired him immediately.

Oscar quickly adapted himself to the style of the orchestra.

A good blending with Dante takes place and so a harmonious duo with good intonation is born.

They made their debut on Radio El Mundo at the tango program with the greatest audience, Glostora tango club, on April 1, 1951.

On May 10 that same year he cut his first three recordings with the orchestra: “Porque me das dique”, “Llevátelo todo” and “Flor de fango”, imposing a new style and repertory totally different to Julio Martel’s.

In a short time he was recognized by the public who admired the so-called orchestra of the youth, as the De Angelis Orchestra was known.

Read more about Oscar Larroca, at www.todotango.com

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Pedro Laurenz y su Orquesta Típica.

“De puro guapo” by Pedro Laurenz y su Orquesta Típica with Juan Carlos Casas in vocals, 1940 (English translation).

“De puro guapo” by Pedro Laurenz y su Orquesta Típica with Juan Carlos Casas in vocals, 1940 (English translation).

Music: Pedro Laurenz. Lyrics: Manuel Meaños.

Between cortes y quebradas,
I softly grumbled in your ear
all my flowery verb
that my love told you.

You showed in your smile
all your flirtation,
and I, my manhood defeated …
I, who always knew how to win.

To get your love
I want to bet my life
to the card that I liked …
It is not the first game
in which my rest I have gambled …
And if in the end I take over and win,
—valiant I am in the situation—
there is a knife, brave hand,
courage and bravery
to assert myself.

I have what I want,
and that for valiant and for brave …
It is enough that in one arm I have the rag
and in another the knife …
If my deeds are not enough
I put my courage to the test.
No one advantages my lead
when your love is at stake!

More Argentine Tango lyrics

Letra original en castellano

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