Skip to main content

Argentine Tango School

Tag: history

“Vamos” by Carlos Di Sarli y su Orquesta Típica with Alberto Podestá in vocals, 1944.

“Vamos” by Carlos Di Sarli y su Orquesta Típica with Alberto Podestá in vocals, 1944.

Feliciano Brunelli, Argentine Tango musician, leader and composer.

Feliciano Brunelli

Accordionist, pianist, bandleader and composer (February 7, 1903 – August 27, 1981)

Feliciano Brunelli was a composer and player of tangos, milongas, waltzes, and several other diverse rhythms, giving him the immense popularity he enjoyed for almost 40 years.

He recorded no less than 763 numbers, nearly all for the RCA-Victor label.

In the headquarters of this recording company in the United States, his photograph is on a wall alongside other musicians. He was awarded by being among the top ten-selling artists of that enterprise.

In 1933, he started a new stage in his life, which was the beginning of his popularity. 

Elvino Vardaro passed by his town, got acquainted with Feliciano, and took him to Buenos Aires. For a time, he lived in Elvino’s family house.

Read more about Feliciano Brunelli at www.todotango.com

Listen and buy:

We are happy to have a collaboration with the people from tangotunes.com from whom some of you may have heard, they do high-quality transfers from original tango shellacs.

It is the number 1 source for professional Tango DJs all over the world.

  • Now they started a new project that addresses the dancers and the website is https://en.mytango.online
    You will find two compilations at the beginning, one tango and one vals compilation in amazing quality.
    The price is 50€ each (for 32 songs each compilation) and now the good news!

If you enter the promo code 8343 when you register at this site you will get a 20% discount!

Thanks for supporting this project, you will find other useful information on the site, a great initiative.

Ver este artículo en español

More Argentine Tango music selected for you:

We have lots more music and history

How to dance to this music?

“Mendocina” by Edgardo Donato y su Orquesta Típica with Romeo Gavioli in vocals, 1942.

“Mendocina” by Edgardo Donato y su Orquesta Típica with Romeo Gavioli in vocals, 1942.

Romeo Gavioli, Argentine Tango singer and musician.

Romeo Gavioli

Singer, violinist, composer and bandleader (February 5, 1913 – April 17, 1957)

He represents the archetype of the style in vogue during the forties, with his voice expressing an introspective feeling through delicate phrasing and exquisite musicality.

His way of interpretation carries us to a pleasant, warm mood that makes us remember those light tenors that preceded him.

In 1939, Edgardo Donato summoned him to appear as a singer in his orchestra, along with the other vocalists, Lita Morales and Horacio Lagos, who were wife and husband.

Most of the numbers he recorded, 15, are duets or trios with the other singers.

As a soloist, he only recorded three pieces: the waltz “Mendocina” among them.

Read more about Romeo Gavioli at www.todotango.com

Listen and buy:

  • iTunes music

  • Spotify

We are happy to have a collaboration with the people from tangotunes.com from whom some of you may have heard, they do high-quality transfers from original tango shellacs.

It is the number 1 source for professional Tango DJs all over the world.

  • Now they started a new project that addresses the dancers and the website is https://en.mytango.online
    You will find two compilations at the beginning, one tango and one vals compilation in amazing quality.
    The price is 50€ each (for 32 songs each compilation) and now the good news!

If you enter the promo code 8343 when you register at this site you will get a 20% discount!

Thanks for supporting this project, you will find other useful information on the site, a great initiative.

Ver este artículo en español

More Argentine Tango music selected for you:

We have lots more music and history

How to dance to this music?

“Vieja luna” by Carlos Di Sarli y su Orquesta Típica with Jorge Durán in vocals, 1945.

“Vieja luna” by Carlos Di Sarli y su Orquesta Típica with Jorge Durán in vocals, 1945.

Argentine Tango lyricist Celedonio Flores with singer Carlos Gardel.

Celedonio Flores

Poet and lyricist (August 3, 1896 – July 28, 1947)

When asked in an interview about how he created his successful works, Celedonio Flores answered:

“I search for a piece of life, I live it through in my mind, I take it seriously, and then slowly and carefully I put to work with the lyrics”.

And continued: “As I have had my own experiences and wandered around, as I’ve met scoundrels myself, I can boast of having lived a thousand characters. I am not one of those who believe that the funny tango reflects people’s feelings. We all know that tango is sad as any other music of ours”.

Among his creations, we can mention “Muchacho”, “El bulín de la calle Ayacucho”, “Corrientes y Esmeralda”, “Atenti pebeta”, and the tango we share with you today, “Vieja luna”, by Carlos Di Sarli.

Read more about Celedonio Flores at www.todotango.com

Listen and buy:

We are happy to have a collaboration with the people from tangotunes.com from whom some of you may have heard, they do high-quality transfers from original tango shellacs.

It is the number 1 source for professional Tango DJs all over the world.

  • Now they started a new project that addresses the dancers and the website is https://en.mytango.online
    You will find two compilations at the beginning, one tango and one vals compilation in amazing quality.
    The price is 50€ each (for 32 songs each compilation) and now the good news!

If you enter the promo code 8343 when you register at this site you will get a 20% discount!

Thanks for supporting this project, you will find other useful information on the site, a great initiative.

Ver este artículo en español

More Argentine Tango music selected for you:

We have lots more music and history

How to dance to this music?

“Dice un refrán” by Ángel D’Agostino y su Orquesta Típica with Ángel Vargas in vocals, 1942.

“Dice un refrán” by Ángel D’Agostino y su Orquesta Típica with Ángel Vargas in vocals, 1942.

Enrique Cadícamo playing piano, with his wife, Nelly. Black and withe photo.

Enrique Domingo Cadícamo

(July 15, 1900 – December 3, 1999)

He was a prolific Argentine Tango lyricist, poet, and novelist.

From an initial Symbolist bent, he developed a distinctive, lunfardo-rich style from an early age, and by 1925 he had his first piece, Pompas de jabón”, sung by Carlos Gardel.

Other notable compositions include Madame Ivonne”, “Che, papusa, oí”, “Anclado en París”Muñeca brava”Pa’ que bailen los muchachos”Los mareados”, and the song we share with you today, “Dice un refrán”, with music by Ángel D’Agostino.

Read more about Enrique Cadícamo at wikipedia.org

Listen and buy:

We are happy to have a collaboration with the people from tangotunes.com from whom some of you may have heard, they do high-quality transfers from original tango shellacs.

It is the number 1 source for professional Tango DJs all over the world.

  • Now they started a new project that addresses the dancers and the website is https://en.mytango.online
    You will find two compilations at the beginning, one tango and one vals compilation in amazing quality.
    The price is 50€ each (for 32 songs each compilation) and now the good news!

If you enter the promo code 8343 when you register at this site you will get a 20% discount!

Thanks for supporting this project, you will find other useful information on the site, a great initiative.

Ver este artículo en español

More Argentine Tango music selected for you:

We have lots more music and history

How to dance to this music?

“The Meaning of Tango: the story of the Argentinean dance”, by Christine Denniston.

“The Meaning of Tango: the story of the Argentinean dance”

The Meaning of Tango- The Story of the Argentinian Dance, book cover.

by Christine Denniston.

“When I first fell in love with the Tango, I aimed to make myself as nice to dance with as possible so that good dancers would want to dance with me.”
“I was very fortunate to have encountered a group of people determined to understand how Tango was danced in Buenos Aires. To begin with, we took classes where we could and shared the little information we had. Often we found that the things different people told us about the Tango were contradictory and confusing. There was only one thing to do: go to Buenos Aires and find out how it was done.” (Quoted from the introduction)

More quotes:

“the length of time a person has been dancing may give little indication of how pleasant they will be to dance with – unless their experience of learning the dance has allowed them to learn at least part of what was learned by the people who danced in the prácticas and milongas of the Golden Age.”

Get this book at

  • Amazon books

  • Apple books

    Get it on Apple Books

More about Argentine Tango selected for you:

We have lots of recommendations

How to dance Argentine Tango?