Tag: dancing

Juan Larenza, Argentine Tango musician and composer.

“Para qué te quiero tanto” by Carlos Di Sarli y su Orquesta Típica with Jorge Durán in vocals, 1946.

“Para qué te quiero tanto” by Carlos Di Sarli y su Orquesta Típica with Jorge Durán in vocals, 1946.

Juan Larenza, Argentine Tango musician and composer.

Juan Larenza

Pianist and composer (8 July 1911 – 17 February 1980)

Inspired and prolific composer, he was born in Buenos Aires City.

On his fourteenth birthday his parents surprised him with the gift of a piano.

Even though a cousin of his volunteered to teach him his early exercises he was an intuitive musician and had no need of teachings.

He was self-taught and also in composing.

Among his many compositions we can mention “Para qué te quiero tanto”, with lyrics written by Cátulo Castillo.

Read more about Juan Larenza at www.todotango.com

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Argentine Tango virtual class with Miranda Lindelow: reverse ocho

Argentine Tango virtual class with Miranda Lindelow: reverse ocho

Argentine Tango virtual class with Miranda Lindelow: reverse ocho

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This is my response to “Discussion question” for my course: Aristotle’s Ethics. What do you think is the goal of life? How would you support your answer?

The goal of life is to be a good dancer.

Or whatever you choose to be, but to be good at it. Even more: to be the best you can be.
In any case, it is a matter of taste, and yes, we can argue about it, but you are what your taste makes you like. You can change your taste, changing yourself as a consequence. It is a slow process, requiring a great amount of patience, but if you happen to be unhappy with yourself, having a strong will to change for better, will do the job.
 
Of course, you may lack the will, the stamina, and since our civilization values comfort, user friendly interfaces, customer satisfaction and instant gratification, it will provide an extensive list of reasons why you should remain the way you are, even if you do not fully like yourself, letting you rest assured in this feeling, allowing you to talk and talk about how you would like things to be different, but keeping you in that chatty inaction.
 
A dancer, a true dancer (and, again, this is a matter of taste), is made of a continual reshaping of habits, endless strengthening, advancing “step by step” (metaphorically and literally) in his/her transformations, carefully demanding from himself/herself the maintenance of a conscious awareness of the totality of existence, where no aspect of life is neglected, neither duty nor joy.

The serious devotion of a dancer to his/her art, not devoid of gaiety and fun, provides him/her with such sense of plenitude, that it makes any other non-essential activity seem like a procrastination of the dance.

Does all of this look like egocentric solipsism? A good dancer is as humble as he/she is proud, extremely respectful and caring. You can see it in everything a dancer does. A dancer thrives only in community.

Learn to dance Argentine Tango in the San Francisco Bay Area:

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Argentine Tango virtual class: warming up exercises

Argentine Tango virtual class: warming up exercises

Argentine Tango virtual class: warming up exercises

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I give you a clue that may help you to understand Tango better: Tango is close to you. 

You may have missed it in the lyrics. They always talk about things that are familiar, things that sometimes we miss very much because they are so close to our emotions that become strongly present even in their absence. It is the neighborhood were you grow up, it is your close relationships with relatives and friends, your loved ones, those familiar things and tasks of every day, even when they are in a distant past. They are part of you forever. They are embracing you. 

There is also an opposite idea of what Tango may be: it is the belief that Tango is something that happens far away, in a place from which we are excluded. For instance: a stage, a space that you are not allowed in, a scenography of unreality, flashy lights that leave you in the shadows, a fancy wardrobe that you’ll never wear, a script that cannot be interrupted, all things from which you must remain outside and quiet. 

Which one is Tango for you? 


Learn to dance Argentine Tango in the San Francisco Bay Area:

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Charlo, Argentine Tango singer and composer.

“Rondando tu esquina” by Ángel D’Agostino y su Orquesta Típica with Ángel Vargas in vocals, 1945.

“Rondando tu esquina” by Ángel D’Agostino y su Orquesta Típica with Ángel Vargas in vocals, 1945.

Charlo, Argentine Tango singer and composer.

Charlo

Singer, musician, pianist, actor and composer. (7 July 1906 – 30 October 1990)

In 1928, his profuse presence on record for the label Odeon began not only with Francisco Canaro‘s or Francisco Lomuto’s orchestras —both very popular—,but also with guitars. In his abundant discography with Canaro (more than half a thousand songs until 1931) singer and orchestra alternate protagonism.

From his important work as composer, of rare ability to musically express human drama and romantic rapture, “Rondando tu esquina”, with lyrics by Enrique Cadícamo, stands out.

 

Read more about Charlo at www.todotango.com

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"Qué lento corre el tren" by Enrique Rodriguez y su Orquesta Típica with Armando Moreno in vocals, 1943. Music: Alfredo De Angelis. Lyrics: Carmelo Volpe.

“Qué lento corre el tren” by Enrique Rodriguez y su Orquesta Típica with Armando Moreno in vocals, 1943.

“Qué lento corre el tren” by Enrique Rodriguez y su Orquesta Típica with Armando Moreno in vocals, 1943.

Writer, poet and playwright, Carmelo Volpe was born in Buenos Aires on July 5, 1909 and died on March 18, 1967.

Carmelo Volpe

Lyricist (5 July 1909 – 18 March 1967)

Writer, poet and playwright, Carmelo Volpe was born in Buenos Aires on July 5, 1909 and died on March 18, 1967.

Author of the lyrics of well-known musical pieces such as “A una mujer”, waltz with music by Horacio Salgán; “Cortada de San Ignacio” milonga with music by Horacio Salgán; “Moreno de los morenos” with music by Enrique Maciel, among many others.

In 1940 he was awarded by Radio Belgrano for his work “El intruso” which was performed in the Modern Theater of this capital by the company of Iris Marga under the direction of Alberto Ballerini.

Read more about Carmelo Volpe at www.todotango.com

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