Argentine Tango School

"Recuerdos", Argentine Tango vals music sheet cover.

“Recuerdos” by Ricardo Tanturi y su Orquesta Típica with Alberto Castillo in vocals, 1941.

“Recuerdos” by Ricardo Tanturi y su Orquesta Típica with Alberto Castillo in vocals, 1941.

Alfredo Pelaia

Singer, guitar player and composer (November 15, 1888 – August 30, 1942)

He came to the country as a child, settling with his parents in Mendoza where, as he grew up, he was forming in him the Argentine spirit to the beat of the guitar, learned at an early age in his native Italy.

He made his debut in a theater in the city of Cuyo with a trio called Los Mendocinos, and due to his qualities as an interpreter as well as the native repertoire of Cuyo, simple and beautiful, he became so prestigious that led him to Buenos Aires to record albums for the RCA Victor, obtaining great success with his beautiful waltz “Recuerdos”, a page that is always remembered and links us to that time.

His exquisite art, his beautiful voice, his beautiful songs, brought him closer to his immortal colleague, Carlos Gardel, who gave him his affection.

Read more about Alfredo Pelaia at www.todotango.com

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Raúl Kaplún, Argentine Tango musician and composer.

“Canción de rango (Pa’ que se callen)” by Ricardo Tanturi y su Orquesta Típica with Alberto Castillo in vocals, 1942.

“Canción de rango (Pa’ que se callen)” by Ricardo Tanturi y su Orquesta Típica with Alberto Castillo in vocals, 1942.

Raúl Kaplún, Argentine Tango musician and composer.

Raúl Kaplún

Violinist, leader and composer (11 November 1910 – 23 January 1990)

A great number of the players were not at the level that Tango was beginning to demand from them at the end of the 1930s.

This was, precisely, the historical opportunity that allowed Kaplún to reach the hall of fame as the initiator of the violin virtuosity in Tango.

Kaplún played solo passages with such difficulties that demanded the best of his great interpretative dexterity.

Besides his violin playing, Raúl Kaplún contributed to Tango with great compositions.

Read more about Raúl Kaplún at www.todotango.com

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Miguel Bucino, Argentine Tango dancer, musician and composer.

“Decile que vuelva” by Ricardo Tanturi y su Orquesta Típica with Alberto Castillo in vocals, 1942.

“Decile que vuelva” by Ricardo Tanturi y su Orquesta Típica with Alberto Castillo in vocals, 1942.

Miguel Bucino, Argentine Tango dancer, musician and composer.

Miguel Bucino

Bandoneonist, dancer, lyricist and composer (14 August 1905 – 15 December 1973)

He was the first to dance tango at the Teatro Colón.

In his twenty years as a professional dancer, he taught personalities such as princes Humberto de Savoya and Eduardo de Windsor to dance our tango.

He excelled as well as a composer, recording from sixty to seventy works, including “Decile que vuelva”.

Read more about Miguel Bucino at www.todotango.com

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"Qué podrán decir" by Ricardo Tanturi y su Orquesta Típica with Alberto Castillo in vocals, 1943. Music: Vicente Salerno. Lyrics: Alfredo Bigeschi.

“Qué podrán decir” by Ricardo Tanturi y su Orquesta Típica with Alberto Castillo in vocals, 1943.

“Qué podrán decir” by Ricardo Tanturi y su Orquesta Típica with Alberto Castillo in vocals, 1943.

Vicente Salerno

Violinist and composer (18 July 1907 – 30 December 1974)

Violinist born in Buenos Aires in 1907.

He soon had his own orchestra which appeared on radio stations.

Later he joined the orchestras led by Raúl Kaplún, Nicolás D´Alessandro, Francisco Lauro and, especially, for over twenty-five years he was the lead violinist for Ricardo Tanturi.

From his work as composer and author we selected “Qué podrán decir”.

Read more about Vicente Salerno at www.todotango.com

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Enrique Cadícamo. Poet, lyricist, composer, writer and playwright. Argentine Tango.

“Madame Ivonne” by Ricardo Tanturi y su Orquesta Típica with Alberto Castillo in vocals, 1942.

“Madame Ivonne” by Ricardo Tanturi y su Orquesta Típica with Alberto Castillo in vocals, 1942.

Enrique Cadícamo. Poet, lyricist, composer, writer and playwright. Argentine Tango.

Enrique Cadícamo

Poet, lyricist, composer, writer and theatral writer (15 July 1900 – 3 December 1999)

Enrique Cadícamo was the author of the last tango that Gardel recorded in Argentina before his last tour: the tango “Madame Ivonne”, recorded on November 6, 1933.

And in like manner we may go on commenting successful titles until getting exhausted with that purpose.

Undoubtedly, Enrique Cadícamo was one of the most prolific authors of Tango.

Read more about Enrique Cadícamo at www.todotango.com

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