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Argentine Tango School

“Almagro” by Alfredo de Ángelis y su Orquesta Típica with Oscar Larroca in vocals, 1951.

Oscar Larroca & Alfredo De Angelis. Argentine music at Escuela de Tango de Buenos Aires.Oscar Larroca

Singer
(5 July 1922 – 26 August 1976)

One of the idols of the time, the vocalist Julio Martel, who, with Carlos Dante, had teamed up with the most successful duo of the 40s, split with the Alfredo De Angelis Orchestra. The violinist Víctor Braña, attracted by the color of Larroca’s baritone-like voice, his good intonation, and his diction, plus his good-looking appearance, introduced him to De Angelis, who hired him immediately.

Oscar quickly adapted himself to the style of the orchestra. A good blending with Dante takes place, so a harmonious duo with good intonation is born.

They made their debut on Radio El Mundo at the tango program with the greatest audience, Glostora tango club, on April 1, 1951. Continue reading at www.todotango.com…

“Pregonera” by Alfredo De Angelis y su Orquesta Típica, with Carlos Dante and Julio Martel (1945)

Alfredo De Angelis

Julio Martel, Carlos Dante, Alfredo De Angelis. Escuela de Tango de Buenos Aires. Argentine music.After the mid-thirties, international music prevailed upon Tango to such an extent that our more traditional tango orchestras included foxtrots, polkas, corridos, pasodoble, congas, and rhumbas in its repertoire.
From Francisco Canaro, Francisco Lomuto, and the Típica Victor until Julio De Caro and Osvaldo Fresedo alternated tangos with the most extravagant music.
But the appearance of the audacious and fast beat of Juan D’Arienzo again placed tango into the preference of the young, who not only recovered the liking for its dance but also eagerly started to recreate it.
Hundreds of orchestras and vocalists sprang up, creating the revival of the two-four, and so came the wonderful forties.
Alfredo De Angelis belongs to the group of orchestras that focused their interest on dancing. However, this does not mean they lacked artistic value; on the contrary, they were precise in execution, with good arrangements, and lined up with great musicians and vocalists.
Our intellectual élite always looked down on popular things, on what was easily accepted by people’s choice, because they disregarded and disregard the sociocultural phenomenon represented by dancing.
I always heard people say that De Angelis was a merry-go-round orchestra, that it was only used for dancing rooms, and lacked creativity. I guess the expression alluded to the funny habit of the dancers of their displacement on the place, turning round following the outline of the dancing floor. From another point of view, the criticism may aim at the easy, elementary, and routine music of the merry-go-rounds (carrousels).
I find these definitions somewhat mistaken.
De Angelis had the beauty of a harmonious and synchronized work, from which a neat simple tango was evidenced, achieved through efficient handling of rhythm, a careful respect for melody, and the showcasing of the singer. Continue reading at www.todotango.com….

Itunes music

“Entre tu amor y mi amor” by Alfredo De Ángelis with Juan Carlos Godoy, 1959.

Juan Carlos Godoy

(21 August 1922 – 12 February 2016)
In the city of Campana, where «the soft water was fresher than the river», my friend interviewed today was born.

There’s a gate through which memories go back home and through that open door represented by Juan Carlos’s heart I step into his life, asking him to tell me things. Those things that are said when you are drinking mate in the shade of an old plantation and which we guess may appeal to the public who are the indisputable addressees of our songs.

«Tango began to be something that interested me by 1933 when Agustín Magaldi came to Campana. He had to appear one Sunday at the theater of the Sociedad Italiana, but he had temporarily lost his voice and was unable to sing. He then only talked to the audience and his five guitarists played instead. I was a kid but I recall that Magaldi was a good-looking man and the fact that he was there was enough to please the audience.

«By that time Carlos Gardel appeared at the Teatro Moderno. Continue reading at www.todotango.com...

“Bailarín compadrito” by Alfredo De Ángelis y su Orquesta Típica with Oscar Larroca in vocals, 1953.

“Bailarín compadrito” by Alfredo De Ángelis y su Orquesta Típica with Oscar Larroca in vocals, 1953.

A classic image of Miguel Bucino and Tita Merello dancing tango in a scene from the movie

Miguel Bucino

Bandoneonist, dancer, lyricist, and composer (August 14, 1905 – December 15, 1973)

Miguel Bucino initially struggled as a musician but flourished as a tango dancer and composer. Encouraged by Francisco Canaro to dance, he debuted professionally in 1925 and gained fame touring with figures like Julio De Caro.

Bucino pioneered tango performances at prestigious venues, including Teatro Colón, and across Europe.

His composition skills shone with songs like “Bailarín compadrito.”

After teaching dance to royalty and Hollywood stars, Bucino retired in 1942, profoundly impacting Tango as a performer and composer until his death in 1973.

Read more about Miguel Bucino at www.todotango.com

Listen and buy:

We are happy to have a collaboration with the people from tangotunes.com from whom some of you may have heard, they do high-quality transfers from original tango shellacs.

It is the number 1 source for professional Tango DJs all over the world.

  • Now they started a new project that addresses the dancers and the website is https://en.mytango.online
    You will find two compilations at the beginning, one tango and one vals compilation in amazing quality.
    The price is 50€ each (for 32 songs each compilation) and now the good news!

If you enter the promo code 8343 when you register at this site you will get a 20% discount!

Thanks for supporting this project, you will find other useful information on the site, a great initiative.

Ver este artículo en español

More Argentine Tango music selected for you:

We have lots more music and history

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“Volvamos a empezar” by Alfredo De Ángelis y su Orquesta Típica with Oscar Larroca in vocals, 1953.

“Volvamos a empezar” by Alfredo De Ángelis y su Orquesta Típica with Oscar Larroca in vocals, 1953.

Oscar Larroca, Argentine Tango singer.

Oscar Larroca

Singer 5 July 1922 – 26 August 1976

The great singer Oscar Larroca was born in the neighborhood of Almagro.

In 1951, an event that allowed Oscar’s development and his definitive consecration took place.

A violinist in Alfredo De Angelis‘ orchestra, attracted by the color of his baritone-like voice, good intonation, diction, and good-looking appearance, introduced him to De Angelis, who hired him immediately.

Oscar quickly adapted himself to the style of the orchestra.

In a short time, he was recognized by the public, who admired the so-called “orchestra of the youth”, as the De Angelis Orchestra was known.

Subsequently, he will record the tango that will open all the doors of Latin America for him: “Volvamos a empezar”.

Read more about Oscar Larroca at www.todotango.com

Listen and buy:

  • Amazon music

  • iTunes music

  • Spotify

We are happy to have a collaboration with the people from tangotunes.com from whom some of you may have heard, they do hi-quality transfers from original tango shellacs.

It is the number 1 source for professional Tango DJs all over the world.

  • Now they started a new project that address the dancers and the website is https://en.mytango.online
    You will find two compilations at the beginning, one tango and one vals compilation in an amazing quality.
    The price is 50€ each (for 32 songs each compilation) and now the good news!

If you enter the promo code 8343 when you register at this site you will get a 20% discount!

Thanks for supporting this project, you will find other useful information on the site, a great initiative.

Ver este artículo en español

More Argentine Tango music selected for you:

We have lots more music and history

How to dance to this music?