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Carlos Di Sarli Argentine Tango poster.

“Cero al as” by Carlos Di Sarli y su Orquesta Típica with Alberto Podestá in vocals, 1944.

“Cero al as” by Carlos Di Sarli y su Orquesta Típica with Alberto Podestá in vocals, 1944.

Carlos Di Sarli Argentine Tango poster.

Francisco Bohigas

Lyricist and composer (4 December 1892 – 20 December 1966)

He was a playwright.

He began writing tangos in 1925 and produced titles such as “Cero al as”.

Bohigas was born in Buenos Aires on December 4, 1892, and died in Merlo (province of Buenos Aires) on December 20, 1966.

Read more about Francisco Bohigas at www.todotango.com

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Marcelo Solis and Mimi dancing Argentine Tango

Argentine Tango dancing with Mimi at Enchanted Tango Home 1

Argentine Tango dancing with Mimi at Enchanted Tango Home 1

The experience of reading a poem requires time management which is not the kind demanded by a typical business approach.

Each verse, each word in a poem is absolutely meaningful. Same as when you dance Tango.

Every single moment, each move, each emotion requires all your presence and attention.

It may sound exaggerated to someone that does not dance Tango, but when you dance Tango you are making a statement about the meaning of life at every single moment while you are dancing.

Obviously, this is not the kind of achievement that you produce by installing an app on your smartphone or purchasing a service.

That is why it needs to be clear to you that dancing Tango is not a hobby.

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"Ensueños", Argentine Tango music sheet cover.

“Ensueños” by Carlos Di Sarli y su Orquesta Típica, 1943.

“Ensueños” by Carlos Di Sarli y su Orquesta Típica, 1943.

'Ensueños', Argentine Tango music sheet cover.

Luis Brighenti

Pianist, composer and leader (3 December 1906 – 17 March 1984)

He was born in Buenos Aires, in the neighborhood of Villa Crespo. His father, Héctor, was a musician.

After he finished his elementary school studies he got a job at the Droguería Americana in which he stayed for four years. With his wage, he was paying for his piano lessons.

When he managed to play some pieces, he quit his job and dared to start his career as a musician. He began as many others playing in the cinema theaters of the neighborhood.

In 1927 he was a pianist in the Ricardo Brignolo Orchestra, later switching to several ones.

As a composer, the masterpiece of Luis Brighenti is “Ensueños”, a tango with a beautiful melody.

Even though it has lyrics by Enrique Cadícamo it preferably has been played as an instrumental.

Read more about Luis Brighenti at www.todotango.com

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Osvaldo Pugliese, Anibal Troilo, Floreal Ruiz, Ricardo Tanturi, and other Argentine Tango artists.

“Amiga” by Osvaldo Pugliese y su Orquesta Típica with Roberto Chanel in vocals, 1947.

“Amiga” by Osvaldo Pugliese y su Orquesta Típica with Roberto Chanel in vocals, 1947.

Osvaldo Pugliese, Anibal Troilo, Floreal Ruiz, Ricardo Tanturi, and other Argentine Tango artists.

Osvaldo Pugliese

Pianist, leader, composer. (2 December 1905 – 25 July 1995)

His definitive projection towards the tango he conceived commenced on August 11, 1939, when he reappeared at the café Nacional. 

Pugliese was the leader, pianist, and arranger of a group which this time was working as a cooperative society.

From a café placed in the Villa Crespo neighborhood, they switched to the most important broadcast of the time, Radio El Mundo, so giving origin to an important group of followers made up of fans of his style and adepts of the Communist party.

Of the greatest importance was, when his orchestra finally recorded in 1943, the arrival of Roberto Chanel, tough singer, with nasal sound and compadrito style, who left 31 recordings.

For many years, Osvaldo Pugliese’s orchestra was banned for broadcasting as a means of political censorship but it did not succeed in diminishing his popular acceptance.

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Miguel Nijenshon, Argentine Tango musician and composer.

“Decime qué pasó” by Carlos Di Sarli y su Orquesta Típica with Roberto Rufino in vocals, 1942.

“Decime qué pasó” by Carlos Di Sarli y su Orquesta Típica with Roberto Rufino in vocals, 1942.

Miguel Nijenshon, Argentine Tango musician and composer.

Miguel Nijensohn

Pianist, arranger, leader and composer (1 December 1911 – 9 May 1983)

A very important step in Nijensohn’s career was when he joined the Miguel Caló Orchestra in 1936 in which he was a pianist as well as an arranger.

Miguel Nijenshon gave no chance of rest to his pencil: during tours, he took advantage of the long trips on the train to write the orchestra scores.

His element was music to which he was deeply devoted.

Highly regarded in the tango circles because of his knowledge, renowned figures who did not know how to write music, whistled to him their tangos so that he would write and harmonize them.

As a composer, he made great hits by means of the recordings of Juan D’ArienzoMiguel CalóCarlos Di Sarli, and other orchestras.

As he was a person very popular in the Tango milieu he always got some interpreter for his creations.

Read more about Miguel Nijenshon at www.todotango.com

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