Argentine Tango School

Tag: argentine tango

Argentine Tango by Marcelo Solis and Miranda Lindelow at milonga at Verdi Club in San Francisco

Argentine Tango workshops with Miranda Lindelow

How having solid foundations allows for a more profound expression: embellishments

Marcelo Solis and Miranda Lindelow doing a Tango pose at milonga Verdi Club San Francisco

I have the immense pleasure of organizing 2 workshops with great Maestra and milonguera Miranda Lindelow.

Dates: Sunday, December 4, and Sunday, December 11, from 1 to 3 pm.

The place: La Pista, 3450 Third Street, San Francisco.

Price: $55 in advance, $60 at the door for each workshop, and $100 for both workshops if paid in advance.

These workshops are for both leaders and followers as individual dancers or couples.

We plan to start with exercises to strengthen your foundations, adding embellishment moves that test the strength of your basics and simultaneously bring you up to the next level.

Then we will present you with choreographic phrases into which you can use those embellishments.

Sacadas, paradas, barridas, cadenas, and amagues will be some of the elements we will use in our combinations.

Register for one or both workshops

Join us on either December 4 or 11 or, even better, on both dates. We look forward to sharing our knowledge and passion for Tango.

More Argentine Tango:

Marcelo Solis dancing Argentine Tango with Mimi

How to become a good dancer

–and keep getting better.

Find the answer

Argentine Tango dancing by Marcelo Solis and Mimi at Milonga Parakultural, Salón Canning, Buenos Aires, October 2022.

Argentine Tango waltz dancing with Mimi at Milonga Parakultural Salón Canning

Argentine Tango waltz dancing with Mimi at Milonga Parakultural Salón Canning

Being a good dancer implies a search for greater balance, control, and ease in your movements, both physically and spiritually.

Dancing leads to a greater awareness of your own body.

This has repercussions on a concern to develop increasingly healthy habits and thus develop a more balanced relationship with the people around you and yourself.

Dancing means getting to know yourself and people in general better.

Dancing Argentine Tango is continually learning to see life from the perspective of a person who dances.

Dancing Argentine Tango is dancing your life.

Leer este artículo en español

More  about Argentine Tango

Learn to dance Argentine Tango

Marcelo Solis dancing Argentine Tango with Mimi at Escuela de Tango de Buenos Aires virtual classes.

Learn to dance!

In-person and virtual classes

Find your class

Argentine Tango dancing by Marcelo Solis and Mimi at Milonga Parakultural, Salón Canning, Buenos Aires, October 2022.

Argentine Tango dancing with Mimi at Milonga Parakultural Salón Canning 1

Argentine Tango dancing with Mimi at Milonga Parakultural Salón Canning 1

Interview by Andrea Barron, a college student in Edinburg, TX, at the University of Texas Rio Grande Valley.

  • First and Foremost, Where are you from? Why do you teach Argentinian Tango?

I was born in Argentina. Tango has been part of my life since my childhood. I became an excellent Argentine Tango dancer, and since teaching is a natural skill, I became an Argentine Tango teacher.

  • How did you come across this dance style? How long have you been practicing this style of dance?

As I mentioned, I grew up in an environment where Argentine Tango is always present. Therefore, I started formal learning of the Argentine Tango in 1984.

  • What does Argentinian Tango mean to you? Does it play an essential role in your culture?

Argentine Tango means to me, the highest wisdom you can achieve. I understand Argentine Tango as a practice that helps me improve in all aspects of being human.

  • Do you know the origins of the Argentinian Tango?

The origins of Argentine Tango are highly debated. However, we are confident that it developed in the marginalized sectors of the populations inhabiting Buenos Aires and other urban conglomerates in the Rio de la Plata area during the second half of the 1800s.

  • I understand that you teach Argentinian Tango in the United States; how do you preserve the authenticity of this dance style while introducing it in a different country?

I travel back to my country very often, visit and take classes with my teachers and friends, and dance at the milongas (Tango dance parties) in Buenos Aires to maintain a solid connection to the roots of Argentine Tango.

  • There are eight known styles of Tango, such as Ballroom Tango and Tango Nuevo, to name a few. So how does the Argentinian Tango differ from other types of Tango? This could refer to culture, movement, maybe both, or any other differences that you may think of.

Argentine Tango differs from other dances in the fact that Argentine Tango is a way of life, an approach to existence. In that sense, Argentine Tango is the purest form of dancing. It makes you see life from the point of view of being a dancer.

  • In Argentinian Tango, do performers create any contact or communication with their audience? This could pertain to touch; it can be done vocally or through eye contact.

When you perform Argentine Tango, you dance in the same way that you dance in the milongas (social Tango dance parties): you connect with your partner to form a kind of subjectivity that is of the body of both partners becoming one. From there, you become aware of the surrounding world and adapt your dance to either performance or social dancing situations.

  • What dress wear do dancers wear while performing this style of dance?

I like to dress up, like going to a formal party to teach, dance, socialize, and perform.

  • I am entirely unfamiliar with the Argentinian Tango. To be trained in this dance style, what advice can you provide for beginners before jumping into practices?

My advice to beginners is this: enjoy the pleasure of dancing. Your curiosity will take you to deepen your knowledge of Argentine Tango step by step.

  • Is it challenging to develop the lines of an Argentinian Dancer? How long does it take for a dancer to adapt to the Argentinian Tango’s movement style physically? In ballet, dancers must maintain a straight, strong back and execute graceful motions. In addition, modern dancers are taught to utilize the curvature of the spine and to remain grounded with their movements. Regarding the physical display of the Argentinian Tango, are there any essential tips you can provide for us?

Argentine Tango is infinite. You can continually improve. If you feel you have nothing to improve, you are dead as a dancer. You must train Argentine Tango as a fighter. It would be best if you were solid, versatile, adaptable, and secure. Whatever you achieve with your body implies a spiritual transformation.

Leer esta entrevista en español

Watch more Argentine Tango performances

Learn to dance Argentine Tango

Marcelo Solis dancing Argentine Tango with Mimi at Escuela de Tango de Buenos Aires virtual classes.

Learn to dance!

In-person and virtual classes

Find your class

Argentine Tango dancing by Marcelo Solis & Mimi at milonga Gente Amiga Buenos Aires

Argentine Tango dancing with Mimi at Milonga Gente Amiga

Argentine Tango dancing with Mimi at Milonga Gente Amiga

Empower yourself, nurture your creativity, explore and achieve a greater awareness by dancing Argentine Tango.

Find your style and a way of life so you can express yourself with freedom and elegance and enjoy the beautiful art of dancing.

Live to the fullest.

More about Argentine Tango

Learn to dance Argentine Tango

Get started

Ver en español

Marcelo Solis dancing Argentine Tango with Mimi at Escuela de Tango de Buenos Aires virtual classes.

Learn to dance!

In-person and virtual classes

Find your class

Argentine Tango class by Marcelo Solis assisted by Mimi on salida basica

How to dance Argentine Tango: salida básica

How to dance Argentine Tango: salida básica

The leader walks to join the follower and offers his left hand.
The follower takes it with her right hand and embraces the leader placing her left hand on the leader’s back, and the leader completes the embrace with his right arm.
Change weight.
For the leader:
One: step backward with your right.
Two: step to the side with your left and place your feet together.
Three: forward with your right, stepping outside your partner.
Four: left forward.
Five: feet together.
Six: forward with your left.
Seven: side step with your right.
Eight: feet together.
 
For the follower:
One: step forward with your left.
Two: step to the side with your right, and place your feet close together.
Three: backward with your left.
Four: right backward.
Five: cross your left foot in front of your right foot.
Six: backward with your right.
Seven: side step with your left.
Eight: feet together.
 
Again:
For the leader:
One: step backward with your right.
Two: step to the side with your left and place your feet together.
Three: forward with your right, stepping outside your partner.
Four: left forward.
Five: feet together.
Six, seven, and eight can be count as “tan-go-close”
 
For the follower:
One: step forward with your left.
Two: step to the side with your right, and place your feet close together.
Three: backward with your left.
Four: right backward.
Five: cross your left foot in front of your right foot.
Tan-Go-Close.
 
Maintain a close embrace during the whole sequence.
Arms maintain their shape while remaining elastic.
Walk smoothly and precisely.
Argentine Tango is an improvisational dance. However, elements like this one are useful in your learning process.

Ver esta clase en español

See more video lessons:

See all video lessons

Contact us

%d bloggers like this: