Author: Marcelo Solis

I was born in Argentina. Through my family and the community that saw my upbringing, I have been intimately involved with the culture of Tango all my life, and have been an Argentine Tango dance performer, choreographer and instructor for over 30 years. I profoundly love Tango dancing, music, and culture, particularly that of the Golden Era. I am a milonguero.
Osvaldo Pugliese, Anibal Troilo, Floreal Ruiz, Ricardo Tanturi, and other Argentine Tango artists.

“Amiga” by Osvaldo Pugliese y su Orquesta Típica with Roberto Chanel in vocals, 1947.

“Amiga” by Osvaldo Pugliese y su Orquesta Típica with Roberto Chanel in vocals, 1947.

Osvaldo Pugliese, Anibal Troilo, Floreal Ruiz, Ricardo Tanturi, and other Argentine Tango artists.

Osvaldo Pugliese

Pianist, leader, composer. (2 December 1905 – 25 July 1995)

His definitive projection towards the tango he conceived commenced on August 11, 1939, when he reappeared at the café Nacional. 

Pugliese was the leader, pianist, and arranger of a group which this time was working as a cooperative society.

From a café placed in the Villa Crespo neighborhood, they switched to the most important broadcast of the time, Radio El Mundo, so giving origin to an important group of followers made up of fans of his style and adepts of the Communist party.

Of the greatest importance was, when his orchestra finally recorded in 1943, the arrival of Roberto Chanel, tough singer, with nasal sound and compadrito style, who left 31 recordings.

For many years, Osvaldo Pugliese’s orchestra was banned for broadcasting as a means of political censorship but it did not succeed in diminishing his popular acceptance.

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Miguel Nijenshon, Argentine Tango musician and composer.

“Decime qué pasó” by Carlos Di Sarli y su Orquesta Típica with Roberto Rufino in vocals, 1942.

“Decime qué pasó” by Carlos Di Sarli y su Orquesta Típica with Roberto Rufino in vocals, 1942.

Miguel Nijenshon, Argentine Tango musician and composer.

Miguel Nijensohn

Pianist, arranger, leader and composer (1 December 1911 – 9 May 1983)

A very important step in Nijensohn’s career was when he joined the Miguel Caló Orchestra in 1936 in which he was a pianist as well as an arranger.

Miguel Nijenshon gave no chance of rest to his pencil: during tours, he took advantage of the long trips on the train to write the orchestra scores.

His element was music to which he was deeply devoted.

Highly regarded in the tango circles because of his knowledge, renowned figures who did not know how to write music, whistled to him their tangos so that he would write and harmonize them.

As a composer, he made great hits by means of the recordings of Juan D’ArienzoMiguel CalóCarlos Di Sarli, and other orchestras.

As he was a person very popular in the Tango milieu he always got some interpreter for his creations.

Read more about Miguel Nijenshon at www.todotango.com

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Roberto Chanel, Argentine Tango singer and composer.

“Fuimos” by Osvaldo Pugliese y su Orquesta Típica with Roberto Chanel in vocals, 1946.

“Fuimos” by Osvaldo Pugliese y su Orquesta Típica with Roberto Chanel in vocals, 1946.

Roberto Chanel, Argentine Tango singer and composer.

Roberto Chanel

Singer, composer and lyricist (26 November 1914 – 24 July 1972)

He was an excellent singer, delicate, with a warm tenderness, a typical symbol of his period.

With Pugliese, he recorded 31 tunes, among those which stand out we like to share today “Fuimos”.

For the connoisseurs, he was the best Pugliese’s vocalist, the one who best and with the highest finesse represented the maestro.

With his nasal sound, his canyengue, and his common man’s diction he kept alive the popular roots that gave rise to tango music.

It was Chanel who identified himself as an orchestra instrument, in the manner of a viola, as can be verified since his first recording.

Read more about Roberto Chanel at www.todotango.com

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Marcelo Solis with Myriam Pincen at a milonga in Buenos Aires a night of Argentine Tango dancing.

Argentine Tango class with Myriam Pincen, Buenos Aires, March 2019.

Argentine Tango class with Myriam Pincen, Buenos Aires, March 2019.

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From Myriam Pincen:

“My classes aim to instruct and encourage the dance of Tango Salón Tradicional Argentino, a knowledge that I have acquired over more than 30 years of study with various teachers such as Miguel Gutierrez, Eduardo Arquimbau, Mingo Pugliese, Pepito Avellaneda, J.C. Copes among others, with whom I not only learned to dance but also to teach dance, scene, and choreography.

In my classes we work on everything you need to dance Tango on a dance floor: posture, musicality, balance, cadence, styles, different orchestras, lead and follow, adornments, codes, floor craft, etc.

The final goal is that all can access to enjoy a good tango dance and also to transcend our Buenos Aires’ culture for the next generations.”


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Mario Demarco, Argentine Tango musician and composer.

“Pata ancha” by Osvaldo Pugliese y su Orquesta Típica, 1957.

“Pata ancha” by Osvaldo Pugliese y su Orquesta Típica, 1957.

Mario Demarco, Argentine Tango musician and composer.

Mario Demarco

Bandoneonist, leader, arranger and composer (5 August 1917 – 4 February 1970)

A musician of the first level, he was definitively influenced by two tango schools of marked individuality and deeply rooted in popular taste, those led by Alfredo Gobbi and Osvaldo Pugliese.

But, this marked canyengue model with an evolved style suitable to dancing could have led him to imitation, but far from that, this excellent instrumentalist honestly thought, and so he demonstrated, that between those two esthetic positions, so perfectly evidenced, his own trend would be possible, and so it turned out.

In June 1954 he joined Osvaldo Pugliese’s orchestra.

With that orchestra, he premiered one of his best tangos: “Pata ancha”.

Read more about Mario Demarco at www.todotango.com

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