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“El Entrerriano” by Juan D’Arienzo y su Orquesta Típica, 1946.

“El Entrerriano” by Juan D’Arienzo y su Orquesta Típica, 1946.

The story of “El entrerriano” and its main recordings

With this number the three-section structure that prevailed in the old trend tango began to spread and, more than a hundred years later, “El entrerriano” is still one of the greatest classics of the genre.

The canyengue liveliness of the melody amazed the audience from the first bar.

The dancer José Guidobono, who was present, could not dance as he used to because the spell of those musical notes paralyzed him.

When the number was finished, he approached the composer and suggested,” Why don’t you dedicate it to Segovia?”

He was referring to Ricardo Segovia, a landowner from Entre Ríos, who was making whoopee in the Buenos Aires nights.

Mendizábal told him he would honor him by naming “El entrerriano” his new tango.

Read more about “El entrerriano” at www.todotango.com

Listen and buy:

We are happy to have a collaboration with the people from tangotunes.com from whom some of you may have heard, they do high-quality transfers from original tango shellacs.

It is the number 1 source for professional Tango DJs all over the world.

  • Now they started a new project that addresses the dancers and the website is https://en.mytango.online
    You will find two compilations at the beginning, one tango and one vals compilation in amazing quality.
    The price is 50€ each (for 32 songs each compilation) and now the good news!

If you enter the promo code 8343 when you register at this site you will get a 20% discount!

Thanks for supporting this project, you will find other useful information on the site, a great initiative.

Ver este artículo en español

More Argentine Tango music selected for you:

We have lots more music and history

How to dance to this music?

Continue reading

“Don Juan” by Juan D’Arienzo y su Orquesta Típica, 1936.

“Don Juan” by Juan D’Arienzo y su Orquesta Típica, 1936.

Ernesto Ponzio, Argentine Tango musician and composer.

Ernesto Ponzio

Violinist and composer (10 July 1885 – 21 October 1934)

A porteño, born in that neighborhood called Tierra del Fuego (located between the demolished Penitentiary and La Recoleta).

Because of his father’s death, Ernesto had to interrupt his violin studies at the conservatory.

His household, in need of resources, anticipated the beginning of his performances.

Inns and bars were his first venues.

After his playing he, resolute and joyously, paraded with a small saucer in his hand to collect the money that would help his poor family’s income.

We found out that the well-known tango “Don Juan (El taita del barrio)” was, apparently, written in 1898.

According to different authors, it premiered at the dancehall run by Concepción Amaya, Mamita, Lavalle 2177, around 1900.

Read more about Ernesto Ponzio at www.todotango.com

Listen and buy:

  • Amazon music

  • iTunes music

  • Spotify

We are happy to have a collaboration with the people from tangotunes.com from whom some of you may have heard, they do high-quality transfers from original tango shellacs.

It is the number 1 source for professional Tango DJs all over the world.

  • Now they started a new project that addresses the dancers and the website is https://en.mytango.online
    You will find two compilations at the beginning, one tango and one vals compilation in amazing quality.
    The price is 50€ each (for 32 songs each compilation) and now the good news!

If you enter the promo code 8343 when you register at this site you will get a 20% discount!

Thanks for supporting this project, you will find other useful information on the site, a great initiative.

Ver este artículo en español

More Argentine Tango music selected for you:

We have lots more music and history

How to dance to this music?

“El Pollo Ricardo” by Carlos Di Sarli y su Orquesta Típica, 1946.

“El Pollo Ricardo” by Carlos Di Sarli y su Orquesta Típica, 1946.

A story of two friends

In September 1940, the Carlos Di Sarli Orchestra recorded this tango to great public acclaim for the first time (he will re-record it two more times).

The orchestra leader liked this piece so much that he cut it on three occasions: in September 1940, March 1946, and July 1951.

Who was this Pollo?

The true Pollo was a Uruguayan, born on September 29, 1890, who, when he was a kid, already mingled with adults at the bohemian café reunions like those at La Giralda.

Read more about “El Pollo Ricardo” at www.todotango.com

Listen and buy:

  • Amazon music

  • iTunes music

  • Spotify

We are happy to have a collaboration with the people from tangotunes.com from whom some of you may have heard, they do high-quality transfers from original tango shellacs.

It is the number 1 source for professional Tango DJs all over the world.

  • Now they started a new project that addresses the dancers and the website is https://en.mytango.online
    You will find two compilations at the beginning, one tango and one vals compilation in amazing quality.
    The price is 50€ each (for 32 songs each compilation) and now the good news!

If you enter the promo code 8343 when you register at this site you will get a 20% discount!

Thanks for supporting this project, you will find other useful information on the site, a great initiative.

Ver este artículo en español

More Argentine Tango music selected for you:

We have lots more music and history

How to dance to this music?

“Tal vez será su voz” by Lucio Demare y su Orquesta Típica with Raúl Berón, 1943.

“Tal vez será su voz” by Lucio Demare y su Orquesta Típica with Raúl Berón in vocals, 1943.

Lucio Demare y su Orquesta Típica. Argentine Tango music.

Lucio Demare

Pianist, composer, arranger and leader (9 August 1906 – 6 March 1974)

An innate faculty for musical invention and a delicate creative temper identified, from the very beginning, the characteristics of his oeuvre.

A player of unmistakable sound and phrasing, he has been an authentic speaker with his piano. 

Either his instrumental and vocal charts have the trademark of his fine personality as artist or the groups he led in renderings so satisfying as “Tal vez será su voz”. 

Read more about Lucio Demare at www.todotango.com

Ver este artículo en español

Listen and buy:

  • Amazon music

  • iTunes music

  • Spotify

More Argentine Tango music selected for you:

We have lots more music and history

How to dance to this music?

“Nueve de Julio” by Juan D’Arienzo y su Orquesta Típica, 1935.

9 de julio. Argentine music at Escuela de Tango de Buenos Aires.José Luis Padula

Guitarist, pianist, composer, and leader.
(October 30, 1893 – June 12, 1945)

This musician son of immigrants, born in the northern province of Tucumán, delved into tango and folk music. His father was Italian, he transferred to him his inclination for music.

As a child, he played harmonica and guitar. Unfortunately, he became an orphan at age 12, and he didn’t have the support of his mother. About her, very little is known. Therefore, being still very young, he went out to the streets to work for a living.

He had the idea of attaching his harmonica to the guitar. He fixed it to a stick fastened by a belt to the upper part of the instrument, and so it reached his mouth.

The curiosity that such a combination woke up in people, added to his musical intuition and his facility for melody, allowed him to travel throughout his province and other neighboring places until arriving in Rosario city, in the province of Santa Fe. Continue reading at www.todotango.com...

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