Argentine Tango School

Tag: milonga

Marcelo Solis and Mimi dancing milonga at Argentine Tango class.

Argentine Tango dancing milonga with Mimi at Enchanted Tango Home

"El paisanito", milonga by Music: Pascual Clausi. Lyrics: Melecio Pérez. Disc.

“El paisanito” by Juan D’Arienzo y su Orquesta Típica with Alberto Echagüe in vocals, 1944.

“El paisanito” by Juan D’Arienzo y su Orquesta Típica with Alberto Echagüe in vocals, 1944.

Pascual Clausi

Bandoneon player and composer (25 April 1893 – 22 September 1967)

At the age of 13 he played the accordion, but later he devoted himself to the bandoneon as it was the most popular instrument at the time, and at 17 he started to play professionally in the Eduardo Arolas quartet for the cinemas of Avellaneda. 

With Arolas, he also performed in the famous Café El Estribo on Entre Ríos and Independencia avenue.

He started composing in 1913 with the tango “Paja brava” and continued writing until he reached more or less 400 edited works. 

Among the most successful is the popular milonga “El paisanito”.

Read more about Pascual Clausi at www.todotango.com

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Argentine Tango intermediate class with Miranda_ milonga traspie

Argentine Tango intermediate class on milonga traspie

Canaro en Paris. Music sheet original cover.

“Canaro en París” by Juan D’Arienzo y su Orquesta Típica, 1940.

“Canaro en París” by Juan D’Arienzo y su Orquesta Típica, 1940.

Canaro en Paris. Music sheet original cover.

Alejandro Scarpino

Bandoneonist, leader and composer (16 January 1904 – 27 May 1970)

He was, as a performer, a player with a very good technique and a great command of his instrument.

He was born on January 6, 1922, on 753 Agüero Street —in the heart of the neighborhood of el Abasto—.

In 1925 he appeared at a café of La Boca —Noce—, the place where Scarpino might have composed his famous tango “Canaro en París”.

The composer himself, in a radio interview, said that it was a number with no title. But one day when he was on a streetcar in the Última Hora newspaper he read a headline: «Canaro arrives in Paris». Those lines inspired him and soon later, before the creation of SADAIC, on May 6, 1927 he filed a record —as it was costumary then— at the Biblioteca Nacional as «Gran tango de salón para piano».

Read more about Alejandro Scarpino at www.todotango.com

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Silueta Porteña. Argentine music. Milonga. Escuela de Tango de Buenos Aires.

“Silueta Porteña” by Francisco Canaro y su Orquesta Típica with Roberto Maida in vocals, 1936.

Popular dance or, simply, the milonga

This is a thing connected with urban music and, some decades before, was an activity to which boys used to devote rather long time because they regarded dancing as a spiritual channel and for many of them it became a joyful rite, hardly replaceable.

In the twenties and also partly in the thirties, the venues where people used to go to dance were: backyard dances, neighborhood clubs —where dancing reunions were held—, dancing clubs, dancehalls, tearooms and night clubs. Many of these places lasted up to the late fifties. Continue reading at www.todotango.com…

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