Tag: dance

Pedro Maffia, Argentine Tango musician and composer

“Amurado” by Osvaldo Pugliese y su Orquesta Típica, 1944.

“Amurado” by Osvaldo Pugliese y su Orquesta Típica, 1944.

Pedro Maffia, Argentine Tango musician and composer

Pedro Maffia

Bandoneonist, leader, composer, teacher (28 August 1899 – 16 October 1967)

He was the great stylist of the bandoneon.

Even in his physical attitude in the handling of the instrument.

As soon as he opened his “jaula” (cage, as also the bandoneon was known), getting rid of the spectacular creases of the bellows in fan-like manner…

Because Maffia did not have need of more air.

Read more about Pedro Maffia at www.todotango.com

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El Choclo, Argentine Tango music sheet cover.

“El Choclo” by Ángel D’Agostino y su Orquesta Típica with Ángel Vargas in vocals, 1941.

“El Choclo” by Ángel D’Agostino y su Orquesta Típica with Ángel Vargas in vocals, 1941.

El Choclo, Argentine Tango music sheet cover.

Juan Carlos Marambio Catán

Singer, lyricist, composer and actor (30 July 1895 – 15 February 1973)

Of all Marambio Catán’s activities it is impossible to omit his contribution as author.

Because of that he is remembered today, in a dictum that is not unfair, but it is indeed not thoroughly thought over when all his fame in this sense is based in the memory of three or four pieces. “Acquaforte” with music by Horacio Pettorossi, his most widely known creation which was a hit in the songbooks of Gardel and Magaldi was born in Europe.

Let us add the lyrics of several tangos which became famous in their instrumental versions, such as “El monito”, “Buen amigo” or “El choclo”.

Read more about Juan Carlos Marambio Catán at www.todotango.com

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In Argentina, Brazil and Uruguay, the most widespread proposal is that of the day when man reached the Moon (July 20, 1969).

“A los amigos” by Osvaldo Pugliese y su Orquesta Típica, 1960.

“A los amigos” by Osvaldo Pugliese y su Orquesta Típica, 1960.

Alberto Vaccarezza, Argentine Tango author and lyricists.

Día del amigo

July 20

Friend’s Day is a proposed day to celebrate friendship. It has as antecedent the World Friendship Crusade that had been established in Paraguay in 1958, and that is celebrated every July 30 under the name of Friendship Day.

In other Latin American countries it is celebrated on different dates.

In Argentina, Brazil and Uruguay, the most widespread proposal is that of the day when man reached the Moon (July 20, 1969).

Read more about “Día del amigo” at www.wikipedia.org

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Argentine Tango dancing. Marcelo Solis at milonga. Levels' classes.

About virtual Argentine Tango classes and private lessons online

About virtual Argentine Tango classes and private lessons online

Argentine Tango dancing. Marcelo Solis at milonga.

Our virtual classes online work on the assumption that it is a temporary measure to keep us engaged and improving, having always in mind the ultimate goal of dancing embraced again sooner or later.

Marcelo Solis teaching Argentine Tango virtual classes online

I have to admit that I did not have much confidence in this channel for Tango instruction, but online classes turned out -unexpectedly- to be a wonderful way to observe in detail our students dancing, and a powerful tool to organize the presentation of our knowledge to them.

Of course it doesn’t appeal to everyone, since many seek physical contact in Tango, and/or are more incline to learn in a rather kinesthetic manner.

However, even though these physical/in-person/kinesthetic aspects are what Tango has of unique, offering them in subtle and poetic ways, attracting and seducing us to its adoption and incorporation into the core of our lives, we will always need the aid of visual presentation, clear explanation, meticulous observation and distanced objectiveness that are a fundamental part of the Tango instruction, but which are amplified in the case of the technology that we are obliged to use now. 

Marcelo Solis Argentine Tango with Sofia Pellicciaro

As your Tango teachers (and here I ask myself about the relation between teaching Tango and life coaching), we strongly advise you not to miss this opportunity.

Learning Tango is hard, frustrating some times and humbling often, and all this may become even worst learning in virtual classes… or maybe not, and perhaps you’ll find, like I did, that it is wonderful, that it is powerful, and that thanks to a certain sense of “estrangement” it helps you to understand things differently, making you pay attention to aspects often passed on at the in-person classes, and facilitating you to make your communications more clear and efficient. 

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All of these apply to either students and instructors.

Here we want to share with you what we consider important for you in the process of virtual Argentine Tango instruction online:

For students:

  • Be open minded.

    Definitely the online class will be light years away from in-person classes.

    However, if you come into the classes avoiding the expectation of similarity with, or make up for the in-person class, you will be much more prepared to take advantage of what only virtual classes can offer to you, and are only on-the-side aspects at the in-person classes.

    For instance, since your teacher cannot dance with you or physically move you, he or she will break down the movements into its most elemental constituents, helping you to fully understand what movements and how to execute them, in a way that, being more abstract, will provide you with the opportunity to practice the move in a “timeless” and “spaceless” fashion, a more thoughtful way, and eventually a more aware way.

  • Let the experience teach you.

    Since this is going to be a novel way to learn Argentine Tango, you will find on your path problems that will be only resolved with later corrections.

    For instance, your floor may not be the best for dancing Tango, or your furniture gets in your way, or your internet connection is too slow.

    All these are problems that get fixed much more easily than fixing your Tango. Go ahead and move your furniture, look at hardware stores online for plastic tiles that you can put over your carpet, call your internet provider (now they are offering discounts on upgrades).

    At each class you will get a better set up for your learning environment. And since we are a community, please share your questions regarding solutions to these challenges. I like to ask my students how they are fixing their particular problems, so I may be in the possession of an answer for you already.

  • Pay attention.

    Avoid distractions. If you are not alone at home, let your relatives and spouses know that you’ll be “away” for one hour.

    Even though you are physically at home, you are virtually at your Tango class, and let me tell you, this “virtuality” is very real. You need to be fully engaged in your class. You won’t be able to be in two places simultaneously.

    Even if it is your living room or garage, it is the classroom for the duration of the lesson.

  • Ask questions.

    Do not hesitate. Your instructors need constant feedback to know that the communication is effective.

    Let them know you did not understand something, or you could not see it, or whatever passes your mind that is related to what is worked on during the class.

    Your teacher has modified his/her teaching style to the online channel, so you need to change your usual learning actitudes. Even technical questions related to the technology used for the class are admissible questions. Remember that.

For teachers:

  • Plan your class.

    You will need to adapt your teaching style to the TV or computer screen’s two dimensional space.

    Keep in mind that your student needs to see you all the time. That is why turns are particularly challenging to teach in the virtual class set up.

    My solution to this problem is to segment the turns in its constituents, in order to keep training a fundamental element of Tango, avoiding making students having to look at the screen while they turn away.

  • Have the right tools.

    Supply yourself with a good camera and a good microphone. Since your communications will be exclusively visual and auditory, you need the best tools that you can provide yourself.

    I’ve been using a mini iPad for the camera and a wireless microphone. I like to show the moves having students behind me, so I am doing the with the camera at my back, so the microphone has been essential to make the sound clear even while I am talking looking away fro the camera.

    Although I have to say the iPad and Zoom (the video conference system that we use) are very sensitive in picking up the sound waves.

  • Have good lighting.

    I am using all the lights of my home studio pointed at me, and added an extra lamp with a styrofoam board to reflect light on my face when I get close to the camera.

  • Use screen sharing to play your music.

    This will make your students hear to the music you choose for your class with much better sound quality than if you make it stream from your microphone.

  • Keeping things in order.

    Use the waiting room feature and close the admission at ten minutes into the class to avoid interruptions.

    You can also have an assistant to work as admin. That is my case but it may not be yours.

Marcelo Solis and Miranda Lindelow performing at Union Square in San Francisco, July 2019.

This is what I have to say for now. Please let me know if you have any questions. I will be happy to answer.

The pandemic has demonstrated how much we need to act as a community, and I am very happy to see that everyone in the Tango community worldwide has that attitude.

¡Viva el Tango!

Long life to Tango!

Here are some examples of what we have being working lately in our virtual classes online:











Learn to dance Argentine Tango at our virtual classes

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Learn more about Argentine Tango and have fun watching this movie:

Learn more about Argentine Tango and have fun watching this movie:

Alberto Vaccarezza, Argentine Tango author and lyricists.

Cafe de los maestros (English Subtitled)

Interviews with the musicians and singers from Argentina’s golden days of Tango.

Fitting this ambitious project into his hectic schedule must’ve been a challenge for producer/writer Gustavo Santaolalla.

He’s better known as the Grammy-winning composer of Hollywood film scores.

This movie shows the gathering of the old maestros, the reminiscences, the archive footage of how things used to be, the rehearsal, and the final concert in the most prestigious venue in Buenos Aires, Teatro Colón – which is, naturally, a triumph.

There’s no doubting the sincere, affectionate nature of this project.

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