Anselmo Aieta, Argentine Tango musician, leader, and composer.

“Mariposita” by Osvaldo Fresedo y su Orquesta Típica, 1941.

“Mariposita” by Osvaldo Fresedo y su Orquesta Típica, 1941.

Anselmo Aieta, Argentine Tango musician, leader, and composer.

Anselmo Aieta

Bandoneonist, composer and leader (5 November 1896 – 25 September 1964)

A prominent figure of the generation of tango men of the period 1910-1925, when by that time the schism of the interpretive styles of Tango took place, Aieta turned out to be the most significant rampart that traditionalism opposed to the new evolutionary ways of bandoneon playing.

It is in his overwhelming work as a composer where the flame of his geniality reaches a brighter light, either due to the huge volume of his output or because of that display of originality, beauty, and vigor that beats in each one of the melodies born out of his inexhaustible creative spring which has consecrated him as one of the top rhapsodes of the people.

He was a painter of happiness and sadness that changed colors for sounds.

Read more about Anselmo Aieta at www.todotango.com

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Wilhelm Grosz, Austrian musician and composer.

“Isla de Capri” by Osvaldo Fresedo y su Orquesta Típica with Roberto Ray in vocals, 1935.

“Isla de Capri” by Osvaldo Fresedo y su Orquesta Típica with Roberto Ray in vocals, 1935.

Wilhelm Grosz, Austrian composer, pianist, and conductor. Portrait.

Wilhelm Grosz

Austrian composer, pianist, and conductor (11 August 1894 – 10 December 1939)

Wilhelm Grosz was able to apply a considerable melodic gift to setting the lyrics of popular songs, some of which became international successes.

Among them: “Isla de Capri”.

Grosz’s classical compositions include three operas, two ballets, incidental music for three plays, scores for a number of films, orchestral works, a Symphonic Dance for piano and orchestra, chamber music, piano pieces and songs.

Read more about Wilhelm Grosz at wikipedia.org

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Osvaldo Fresedo y su Orquesta Típica. Argentine Tango music.

“Arrabalero” by Osvaldo Fresedo y su Orquesta Típica, 1939.

“Arrabalero” by Osvaldo Fresedo y su Orquesta Típica, 1939.

Osvaldo Fresedo y su Orquesta Típica. Argentine Tango music.

Osvaldo Fresedo

Bandoneonist, director and composer. (5 May 1897 – 18 November 1984)

Born in Buenos Aires to a wealthy family seems to have influenced his art: his orchestra, refined and aristocratic, was the favorite of upper circles.

However, despite Osvaldo’s father was a rich businessman, at the age of ten, his family moved to La Paternal, a neighborhood somewhat away and humble, with flat houses in a popular surrounding which had its effect on his destiny.

It was there where he started playing the bandoneon.

His was the longest tango career ever found: over 1,250 recordings along 63 years.

Read more about Osvaldo Fresedo at www.todotango.com

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"Después del carnaval", Argentine Tango music sheet cover.

“Después del carnaval” by Osvaldo Fresedo y su Orquesta Típica with Ricardo Ruiz in vocals, 1941.

“Después del carnaval” by Osvaldo Fresedo y su Orquesta Típica with Ricardo Ruiz in vocals, 1941.

Carnival in Argentina

Music & lyrics: José Amuchástegui Keen.

Nearly all the countries in the world celebrate it, whatever their religion, according to their customs and traditions. 

That rapture, that makes a break in routine life, has been the origin of love affairs and disappointments, joys and sadness and even duels of passion.

Our carnival was not much different.

The most popular fancy costumes were those of Colombine, Pierrot, (Italian) cocoliche, harlequin, clown, the dangerous grizzly bear —whose use was banned because on several occasions they were set on fire (the costumes were made of wool and would burn soon—; and many others. 

Even a simple mask added to plain clothes meant some kind of sympathetic support.

Read more about carnival in Argentina at www.todotango.com

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Juan Carlos Thorry. Music at Escuela de Tango de Buenos Aires.

“Vida querida” by Osvaldo Fresedo y su Orquesta Típica, vocals by Ricardo Ruiz.

Juan Carlos Thorry

By Juan Carlos Thorry

My relationship with tango is old, intimate and sentimental. I was a young kid and then my old man, who used to play guitar, taught me some accompaniments (dominant and tonic chords) with which I began my Argentine-Tango-Classes-San-Francisco-Bay-Area-Buenos-Airesearly «two-four» songs. Which melody would I have learned first? I remember, through the distant time, the counter line of “La cumparsita (Si supieras)”, the one that says: «Si supieras, que aún dentro de mi alma…» And then, years later, «Buenos Aires, la reina del Plata…», or «Rechiflao en mi tristeza…», when I became acquainted with Carlos Gardel.
My first long trousers, the end of my high school studies and the time when I entered the university are very closely linked to my early experiences at dancehalls. We used to go to dance to the venues called then cabarets, which later became boites and thereafter night-clubs and now are boliches. There we held a contest of twists and turns dancing with the best players of the period: Aníbal Troilo, Juan D’Arienzo, Osvaldo Fresedo, Osvaldo Pugliese, Edgardo Donato, Alfredo De Angelis, etc. They caressed our adolescent dreams with the most popular melodies of the time.
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