"Bajo un cielo de estrellas", Argentine Tango music sheet cover.

“Bajo un cielo de estrellas” by Miguel Caló su Orquesta Típica with Alberto Podestá in vocals, 1941.

“Bajo un cielo de estrellas” by Miguel Caló su Orquesta Típica with Alberto Podestá in vocals, 1941.

Héctor Stamponi

Pianist, leader, arranger, composer and lyricist (24 December 1916 – 3 December 1997)

The beauty and the originality of his waltzes are evidenced in titles like “Bajo un cielo de estrellas” composed in collaboration with Enrique Francini, and lyrics by José María Contursi.

He was born in Campana, province of Buenos Aires.

There he studied music with a local maestro, who made him join a small ensemble he led.

Later he joined many other orchestras and travel to Central America and Mexico.

When he returned to Buenos Aires he began to study with the maestro Alberto Ginastera (harmony) and Julián Bautista (composition) (1946) and put together an excellent Tango orchestra under a recording contract with the Victor label.

When he left this activity he continued as piano soloist, accompanist, and arranger.

The most important interpreters requested his collaboration. 

Read more about Héctor Stamponi at www.todotango.com

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Miguel Caló vinyl cover

“Que falta que me hacés” by Miguel Caló y su Orquesta Típica with Alberto Podestá in vocals, 1963.

“Que falta que me hacés” by Miguel Caló y su Orquesta Típica with Alberto Podestá in vocals, 1963.

Miguel Caló vinyl disc's cover

Orquesta Típica Miguel Caló

This bandoneon player who soon stopped playing his instrument to become an orchestra leader had a long career.

His decision evidenced his professional seriousness because he realized that other players were better instrumentalists than he was.

Throughout his extensive career for forty years he went to the recording studios to cut around 366 renditions.

Some numbers were recorded twice or three times with different singers.

Read more about Miguel Caló orchestra at www.todotango.com

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Miguel Caló, Argentine Tango musician, conductor and composer.

“Dos fracasos” by Miguel Caló y su Orquesta Típica with Alberto Podestá in vocals, 1941.

“Dos fracasos” by Miguel Caló y su Orquesta Típica with Alberto Podestá in vocals, 1941.

Miguel Caló, Argentine Tango musician, conductor and composer.

Miguel Caló

Bandoneonist, leader and composer (28 October 1907 – 24 May 1972)

Even though his most transcendental success is related to tango in the forties, his work starts in the late twenties and is consolidated during the thirties.

The forties reveal us the maturity of this great director, capable of assembling an outfit of young musicians of extraordinary capacity and professionalism, and all of them later organized their own groups.

The Miguel Caló orchestra will be remembered as the best tango performance, one that goes beyond its age and that today is recognized for its great artistic qualities and by a dancing group that permanently evokes it.

Read more about Miguel Caló at www.todotango.com

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Alberto Podesta. Argentine music at Escuela de Tango de Buenos Aires.

“Yo soy el Tango” by Miguel Caló y su Orquesta Típica with Alberto Podestá in vocals, 1941.

Alberto Podesta. Argentine music at Escuela de Tango de Buenos Aires.Alberto Podestá

Singer and composer
(22 September 1924 – 9 December 2015)

“The first four numbers recorded with Miguel Caló I made them under the name Juan Carlos Morel, because there were then other singers with the family name Podestá, which was my mother’s, but Caló was not willing to have any trouble with family names.”

“Later, Di Sarli asked me my surname and said: “Boy, from now on you’ll be Alberto Podestá and from all those who bear that last name you’ll be the only one who’ll sing for the longest time”. See how much Don Carlos knew!”. Continue reading at www.todotango.com…

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