Juan D'Arienzo and his orchestra with Alberto Echagüe in vocals. Argentine Tango music.

“Nada más” by Juan D’Arienzo y su Orquesta Típica with Alberto Echagüe in vocals, 1938.

“Nada más” by Juan D’Arienzo y su Orquesta Típica with Alberto Echagüe in vocals, 1938.

Juan D'Arienzo and his orchestra with Alberto Echagüe in vocals. Argentine Tango music.

Juan D’Arienzo

Violinist, leader and composer (14 December 1900 – 14 January 1976)

D’Arienzo contributed a fresh, juvenile, enlivening air to Tango.

Tango turned one day into a sad thought which can be danced to… It can be… The dance had become subsidiary then, but then had been displaced by lyrics and the singers, and now it is displaced by the arrangement.

So: D’Arienzo gave Tango back to the dancers’ feet and with that he made Tango be again of interest for the young.

The King of Beat turned into the king of dancing, and by making people dance he earned a lot of money, which is a nice way to get it.

D’Arienzo made possible that Tango renaissance called La Década del Cuarenta (the 40s).

In 1949 D’Arienzo said: “In my point of view, tango is, above all, rhythm, nerve, strength and character. Early tango, that of the old stream (Guardia Vieja), had all that, and we must try not to ever lose it.”

Read more about Juan D’Arienzo at www.todotango.com

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"Yo me llamo Eloy Peralta", vinyl disc Argentine Tango milonga

“Yo me llamo Eloy Peralta” by Juan D’Arienzo y su Orquesta Típica with Alberto Echagüe in vocals, 1944.

“Yo me llamo Eloy Peralta” by Juan D’Arienzo y su Orquesta Típica with Alberto Echagüe in vocals, 1944.

Jacinto Font

Lyricist and journalist (2 September 1892 – 15 April 1962)

His participation within journalism dates from the time of the first Buenos Aires newspapers in which he served as a theatrical and turf chronicler. 

He proudly wore a gold medal won in a turf forecasting contest.

His interests led him to write songs for plays, singing some of his tangos on stage.

From his work as a composer, we highlight “Yo me llamo Eloy Peralta”.

Read more about Jacinto Font at www.todotango.com

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'Seamos amigos' By D'Arienzo - Echagüe. Argentine Tango music vinyl disc.

“Seamos amigos” by Juan D’Arienzo y su Orquesta Típica with Alberto Echagüe in vocals, 1944.

“Seamos amigos” by Juan D’Arienzo y su Orquesta Típica with Alberto Echagüe in vocals, 1944.

Domingo Rullo

Bandoneonist. lyricist and composer (26 July 1920 – 27 November 2001)

When Rullo was five years old, for the first time he saw a bandoneon in the hands of a «famous» character who had arrived in town.

That well-known player was no less than Juan Maglio Pacho.

From that moment on, that instrument was his life passion.

At age eight he moved to the city of Rosario in order to study with another «famous» man of Rosario, Juan Rezzano.

In March 1941 his appearance was no less than at the Chantecler cabaret.

The mâitre was a Cuban guy named Ángel Sánchez Carreño, but he was known as Príncipe Cubano.

The latter wrote the lyrics for his best-known tango: “Seamos amigos”. 

Read more about Domingo Rullo at www.todotango.com

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"Mandria" by Juan D'Arienzo y su Orquesta Típica with Alberto Echagüe in vocals, 1939. Music: Juan Rodríguez. Lyrics: Francisco Brancatti / Juan Velich.

“Mandria” by Juan D’Arienzo y su Orquesta Típica with Alberto Echagüe in vocals, 1939.

“Mandria” by Juan D’Arienzo y su Orquesta Típica with Alberto Echagüe in vocals, 1939.

Francisco Brancatti

Lyricist, singer, guitarist and composer (2 July 1890 – 4 June 1980)

He was a great figure of Argentine popular music.

He wrote with Juan Velich the verses of “Mandria”, in 1926.

The music belongs to the Argentine pianist Juan Carlos Rodríguez.

It became a long lasting success.

Read more about Francisco Brancatti at www.todotango.com

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"Qué importa", Argentine Tango music. Vinyl disk.

“Qué importa” by Juan D’Arienzo y su Orquesta Típica with Alberto Echagüe in vocals, 1939 (English translation).

“Qué importa” by Juan D’Arienzo y su Orquesta Típica with Alberto Echagüe in vocals, 1939 (English translation).

Music: Ricardo Tanturi. Lyrics: Juan Carlos Thorry.

A short time ago it was your love
the light that illuminated my existence
and for both of us, it was only yesterday,
there was no word absence.

Ours was the love of twenty years,
love of Margarita and Duval.
But, the usual, a disappointment
in the end she had to push us away.

What does it matters
to be told that you have changed
and that you have placed a jewel
on the site of the heart!

What does it matters
if you left my side,
only I know why it was
I paid for your love
with evil and treason.

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Letra original en español

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