Argentine Tango School

Roberto Maida, Argentine Tango singer and composer.

“No hay que hacerse mala sangre” by Francisco Canaro y su Orquesta Típica with Roberto Maida in vocals, 1935.

“No hay que hacerse mala sangre” by Francisco Canaro y su Orquesta Típica with Roberto Maida in vocals, 1935.

Roberto Maida, Argentine Tango singer and composer.

Roberto Maida

Singer and lyricist (3 March 1908 – 30 March 1993)

He arrived in our country from his Italian hometown in 1909 and settled with his family in Buenos Aires, in the neighborhood of Balvanera.

With other kids he looked after the herd of horses that pulled carts and flat wagons, while the drivers ate at the cheap restaurants in the vicinity of the market.

He began his artistic career at a very early age in the backyard of the restaurant Damato on Matheu and Victoria. There he used to meet with the owner’s sons and the kids of his gang and they organized tango sessions in which he was the singer. One day a singing instructor named Ralbis came to have lunch and wanted to know who that singer was. He suggested him to sing at a cinema theater in the intermission shows, accompanied by piano, violin and drums. The beginner was doubtful but his friends encouraged him. He put on brand-new long trousers and made his debut at the 2º Coliseo cinema theater on Bernardo de Irigoyen and Venezuela. The owners of the theater, José and Antonio Galvano were very enthusiastic and placed a big photo of Maida the kid at the hall.

Roberto Maida’s association with Canaro began in November 1934.

Read more about Roberto Maida, at www.todotango.com

Listen and buy:

  • Amazon music

  • iTunes music

  • Spotify

We are happy to have a collaboration with the people from tangotunes.com from whom some of you may have heard, they do hi-quality transfers from original tango shellacs.

It is the number 1 source for professional Tango DJs all over the world.

  • Now they started a new project that address the dancers and the website is https://en.mytango.online
    You will find two compilations at the beginning, one tango and one vals compilation in an amazing quality.
    The price is 50€ each (for 32 songs each compilation) and now the good news!

If you enter the promo code 8343 when you register at this site you will get a 20% discount!

Thanks for supporting this project, you will find other useful information on the site, a great initiative.

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Minotto Di Cicco, Argentine Tango musician.

“Recuerdos de París” by Francisco Canaro y su Orquesta Típica with Roberto Maida in vocals, 1937.

“Recuerdos de París” by Francisco Canaro y su Orquesta Típica with Roberto Maida in vocals, 1937.

Minotto Di Cicco, Argentine Tango musician.

Minotto Di Cicco

Bandoneonist and leader (11 October 1898 – 9 September 1979)

He was born in Montevideo, Uruguay.

He had two brothers musicians: Ernesto, a bandoneon player like him, and Fioravanti, a pianist, who succeeded in Europe.

At age twelve he started his studies of piano playing and music reading.

He changed the piano for the accordion, an instrument that interested him very much.

Then he traveled to Buenos Aires and bought a bandoneon.

In 1932 began a new stage associated with Francisco Canaro. He went on with this until his retirement.

Read more about Minotto Di Cicco at www.todotango.com

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Minotto Di Cicco, Argentine Tango musician.

“Invierno” by Francisco Canaro y su Orquesta Típica with Roberto Maida in vocals, 1937.

“Invierno” by Francisco Canaro y su Orquesta Típica with Roberto Maida in vocals, 1937.

Minotto Di Cicco, Argentine Tango musician.

Minotto Di Cicco

Bandoneonist and leader (11 October 1898 – 9 September 1979)

Minotto was a great technician of the bandoneon and an eternal studious player of his instrument.

For many years associated —with some breaks— to the Francisco Canaro’s orchestra to which he always contributed with his playing to the disciplines of its leader, he was a solo player, for his close friends, of melodic themes performed with high sound quality and a perfect fingering.

He was at the same level as the greats of his time.

Nearly fifty years of honest work in the service of Tango by a great artist, a very important bandoneon player, deserve the constant memory and the adequate diffusion of his talent.

Read more about Minotto Di Cicco at www.todotango.com

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Alberto Soifer, Argentine Tango musician, leader and composer.

“Largá las penas” by Francisco Canaro y su Orquesta Típica with Roberto Maida in vocals, 1935.

“Largá las penas” by Francisco Canaro y su Orquesta Típica with Roberto Maida in vocals, 1935.

Alberto Soifer, Argentine Tango musician, leader and composer.

Alberto Soifer

Composer, pianist and director (1 August 1907 – 1 September 1977)

Alberto joined the Francisco Canaro orchestra to replace the pianist Luis Riccardi that was ill. He admired, above all, two qualities of Pirincho: his musical inventiveness and his capacity as manager.

He was the annotator of many tangos composed by Canaro who ignored how to write music. 

One of the hit he made was the milonga “Largá las penas”. 

Read more about Alberto Soifer at www.todotango.com

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Luis César Amadori,Lyricist, author, entrepreneur, filmmaker and journalist (28 May 1902 - 5 June 1977)

“Yo también soñé” by Francisco Canaro y su Orquesta Típica with Roberto Maida in vocals, 1936.

“Yo también soñé” by Francisco Canaro y su Orquesta Típica with Roberto Maida in vocals, 1936.

Luis César Amadori ,Lyricist, author, entrepreneur, filmmaker and journalist (28 May 1902 - 5 June 1977)

Luis César Amadori

Lyricist, author, entrepreneur, filmmaker and journalist (28 May 1902 – 5 June 1977)

Like many other Italian families that came to our country to search for their fortune, he arrived in our country when he was five from Pescara, his hometown.

Writing for theater drove him to write as well the lyrics of numerous songs, mainly tangos.

With Francisco Canaro he wrote among other tangos “Yo también soñé”.

Read more about Luis César Amadori at www.todotango.com

Listen and buy:

  • Amazon music

  • iTunes music

  • Spotify

We are happy to have a collaboration with the people from tangotunes.com from whom some of you may have heard, they do high-quality transfers from original tango shellacs.

It is the number 1 source for professional Tango DJs all over the world.

  • Now they started a new project that addresses the dancers and the website is https://en.mytango.online
    You will find two compilations at the beginning, one tango and one vals compilation in amazing quality.
    The price is 50€ each (for 32 songs each compilation) and now the good news!

If you enter the promo code 8343 when you register at this site you will get a 20% discount!

Thanks for supporting this project, you will find other useful information on the site, a great initiative.

Ver este artículo en español

More Argentine Tango music selected for you:

We have lots more music and history

How to dance to this music?

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