"Yo soy de San Telmo", Argentine Tango music vinyl disc.

“Yo soy de San Telmo” by Carlos Di Sarli y su Orquesta Típica with Roberto Rufino in vocals, 1943.

“Yo soy de San Telmo” by Carlos Di Sarli y su Orquesta Típica with Roberto Rufino in vocals, 1943.

Arturo Gallucci

Double bass player, composer and lyricist (17 January 1909 – 23 June 1978)

Born in the Buenos Aires neighborhood of San Cristóbal, his experience, forged since childhood in the variety troupe Los Fregolini directed by his parents, enriched his musical knowledge (he learnt to play guitar, double bass and cornet) and brought him a charismatic personality with artistic inquisitiveness.

His career, exemplifies the ones of many composers that fully worked in the generation of the forties, almost anonymously nurturing the repertoire of the great tango orchestras with their pieces either those with traditional rhythmical expression or those with a deeper melodic and harmonic evolution.

And always they had a milonguero lineage, danceable and suitable for singing, with wide popular acclaim.

Since a young age he had been acquainted with lyricists, musicians, radio men and people of the night scene.

The Café El Águila, the Marzotto, the Petit Salón were some of his preferred venues. In them he met Carlos Di Sarli, in whose bohemian circle he established a close friendship with him and in whose school of romantic melodiousness he forged his vein in composing.

Precisely, it was Di Sarli who, in 1943, gave him his career move by recording with his orchestra the milonga “Yo soy de San Telmo”.

Read more about Arturo Gallucci at www.todotango.com

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Roberto Rufino, Argentine Tango singer and composer.

“Mañana zarpa un barco” by Carlos Di Sarli y su Orquesta Típica with Roberto Rufino in vocals, 1942.

“Mañana zarpa un barco” by Carlos Di Sarli y su Orquesta Típica with Roberto Rufino in vocals, 1942.

Roberto Rufino, Argentine Tango singer and composer.

Roberto Rufino

Singer and composer (6 January 1922 – 24 February 1999)

Listening to Roberto Rufino when he sang any of the tangos he had chosen for his repertoire, was to realize that that tango was unraveling little by little and that the words sprang up separately, without forsaking the whole that gathered them, with the proper strength they had to have in their context.

Rufino was that: a storyteller, a phraser, an interpreter that perfectly knew which was the meaning of what he was singing.

Fame had already touched him with its magic wand and at the age of 21 or 22, he had an unprecedented discographic record.

In fact, he recorded, together with Di Sarli, forty-six numbers.

Read more about Roberto Rufino at www.todotango.com

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"Corazón", Argentine Tango music sheet cover.

“Corazón” by Carlos Di Sarli y su Orquesta Típica with Roberto Rufino in vocals, 1939.

“Corazón” by Carlos Di Sarli y su Orquesta Típica with Roberto Rufino in vocals, 1939.

Héctor Marcó

Lyricist, singer, composer and actor (12 December 1906 – 30 September 1987)

“I was born at a house on Boedo Street, on December 12, 1906. Since an early age, I liked to sing and write and I joined the usual school choirs at the patriotic celebrations.

In 1939 I met Carlos Di Sarli. He praised my work and asked me if I was willing to collaborate with him.

We went to a bar on Tucumán and Maipú and he began to hum a tango to me.

Soon I told him its name: «It’s going to be called “Corazón”.»

Roberto Rufíno recorded it on December 11, 1939.

After this first recording, I was in the studio, Di Sarli left the piano and told me: “Congratulations. If you like we can be collaborators from now on”.

Read more about Héctor Marcó at www.todotango.com

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Miguel Nijenshon, Argentine Tango musician and composer.

“Decime qué pasó” by Carlos Di Sarli y su Orquesta Típica with Roberto Rufino in vocals, 1942.

“Decime qué pasó” by Carlos Di Sarli y su Orquesta Típica with Roberto Rufino in vocals, 1942.

Miguel Nijenshon, Argentine Tango musician and composer.

Miguel Nijensohn

Pianist, arranger, leader and composer (1 December 1911 – 9 May 1983)

A very important step in Nijensohn’s career was when he joined the Miguel Caló Orchestra in 1936 in which he was a pianist as well as an arranger.

Miguel Nijenshon gave no chance of rest to his pencil: during tours, he took advantage of the long trips on the train to write the orchestra scores.

His element was music to which he was deeply devoted.

Highly regarded in the tango circles because of his knowledge, renowned figures who did not know how to write music, whistled to him their tangos so that he would write and harmonize them.

As a composer, he made great hits by means of the recordings of Juan D’ArienzoMiguel CalóCarlos Di Sarli, and other orchestras.

As he was a person very popular in the Tango milieu he always got some interpreter for his creations.

Read more about Miguel Nijenshon at www.todotango.com

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Vinyl disc Di Sarli, Argentine Tango music.

“Canta pajarito” by Carlos Di Sarli y su Orquesta Típica with Roberto Rufino in vocals, 1943.

“Canta pajarito” by Carlos Di Sarli y su Orquesta Típica with Roberto Rufino in vocals, 1943.

Vinyl disc Di Sarli, Argentine Tango music.

Juan José Guichandut

Pianist and composer (11 November 1909 – 17 October 1979)

He started making music as a teenager and his artistic life put him on track towards composing entirely.

He began in 1927 with a first composition that obtained second place in the tango contest of the National records, a work that made possible his acquaintance with Carlos Gardel, who also recorded other tangos for him.

His great virtues continued to be exhibited in many other compositions.

Today we highlight “Canta pajarito”.

Read more about Juan José Guichandut at www.todotango.com

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