Angel Vargas. Argentine music at Escuela de Tango de Buenos Aires.

“No aflojés” by Ángel D’Agostino y su Orquesta Típica with Ángel Vargas in vocals, 1940.

Angel Vargas. Argentine music at Escuela de Tango de Buenos Aires.Ángel Vargas

Singer, lyricist and composer
(22 October 1904 – 7 July 1959)

He was the paradigm of the orchestra singer, to such an extent that when we refer to Ángel Vargas, we are inevitably reminded of Ángel D’Agostino, the orchestra leader of his greatest hits.

A singer with impressive personality, he is the symbol of porteño (from Buenos Aires) tango phrasing in the 40s. Vargas sings as only in the 40s tango was sung.
His phrasing was reo and compadrito but at the same time of an infinite good taste.

He had a sweetness which compensated for his small but masculine voice, he generated sympathy and was, above all, a charismatic singer.

Among his recordings these tango interpretations stand out “No aflojés”. Continue reading at www.todotango.com…

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Luis César Amadori. Argentine music at Escuela de Tango de Buenos Aires.

“Madreselva” by Ángel D’Agostino y su Orquesta Típica with Ángel Vargas in vocals, 1944.

Luis César Amadori. Argentine music at Escuela de Tango de Buenos Aires.Luis César Amadori

Lyricist, author, entrepreneur, filmmaker and journalist
(28 May 1902 – 5 June 1977)

Writing for theater unavoidably drove him to write as well the lyrics of numerous songs, mainly tangos. He said at an interview: «As we always had in our company a star who sang tangos —Azucena Maizani, Mercedes Simone and, for me, the dearest one, the unforgettable Sofía Bozán—, I began to write lyrics for tangos». Continue reading.

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Ángel D'Agostino with Ángel Vargas. Argentine music at Escuela de Tango de Buenos Aires.

“Tres esquinas” by Ángel D’Agostino y su Orquesta Típica with Ángel Vargas in vocals, 1941.

Ángel D'Agostino with Ángel Vargas. Argentine music at Escuela de Tango de Buenos Aires.Ángel D’Agostino

Pianist, composer and leader
(25 May 1900 – 16 January 1991)

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I have been a precocious porteño. I was born on Moreno Street between Virrey Cevallos and Solís on May 25, 1900. In my family we were all musicians whether due to study or liking. As at home there was a piano before I was six I decided I had to study. In a short time I had command of the keyboard and soon thereafter I was regarded as a child prodigy and since then I have been playing before audiences. Continue reading at todotango.com…

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Celedonio Flores. Argentine Tango music. Escuela de Tango de Buenos Aires. Learn to dance.

“Muchacho” by Ángel D’Agostino y su Orquesta Típica with Ángel Vargas

Argentine Tango dance classes for beginners, intermediate and advanced level. Argentine Tango dance Private lessons. one to one Argentine dance lessons. Argentine Tango dance lessons for couples. Milongas and workshops. With Marcelo Solís.Celedonio Flores

Poet and lyricist
(3 August 1896 – 28 July 1947)

Born in Buenos Aires, at Villa Crespo neighborhood, the place where native and immigrants of various origins co-existed. His childhood and adolescence were spent amid such popular environment until he became, in the 20s, a very famous poet and lyric composer. His tangos, many times full of condemn, moral reflections and master descriptions of his characters, very much resorted to the lunfardo, the local argot/slang. Like other famous lyricists composers, Flores was both an educated and popular poet. A bohemian, also boxer. His most creative time extended until the early 30s but his work survived.

In 1920, he sent to the then published newspaper Última Hora a poem entitled Por la pinta for which he received 5 pesos. But he would be much more rewarded when those verses called the attention of Carlos Gardel and his duet partner, José Razzano, who both composed the music. This is how the tango “Margot” was born: a bitter criticism to the humble beautiful girl who adopts a French style and perverts to get rid of her poverty fate, arousing people’s feelings. Continue reading at www.todotango.com...

Enrique Cadícamo. Argentine Tango music at Escuela de Tango de Buenos Aires. Learn too dance.

“Ave de paso”, by Ángel D’Agostino y su Orquesta Típica with Ángel Vargas (1945)

Enrique Cadícamo - Argentine Tango dance classes for beginners, intermediate and advanced level. Argentine Tango dance Private lessons. one to one Argentine dance lessons. Argentine Tango dance lessons for couples. Argentine Tango Milongas and workshops.Cadícamo: “Tango needs not to be changed”

Excerpts from a conversation with Enrique Cadícamo: «I don’t agree at all with the so-called avant-garde of tango. Vanguard is what first falls in a line of fire. In a combat a vanguard is the part of an army which goes ahead of the main body. In tango there is something similar. The vanguard of tango is the first thing that falls before the indifference of all those who know what tango is.

«Tango has popular roots, like other rhythms in other parts of the world that have not changed nor have they been distorted nor have they been presented with a new packaging. Can one update cante jondo? It would be nonsense. Why? Because it comes from popular roots, Moorish, Spanish. I love all that means progress but in some things it doesn’t make sense. For machinery, for computers, for shows is all right. But not for this.

«Tango is a very humble, very simple thing. It was played by guys who had no formal musical training like Ángel Villoldo, Eduardo Arolas, Enrique Delfino. It was a feeling that was worth more than all the orthodox part contained in the written music. We have to keep tango the way it is. It is our thing, it is a landscape that remained as it was before. The tango has already come. It is impossible to speak of tango yet to come. Continue reading

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