Argentine Tango School

"Demasiado tarde", Argentine Tango vinyl disc.

“Demasiado tarde” by Ángel D’Agostino y su Orquesta Típica with Ángel Vargas in vocals, 1946.

“Demasiado tarde” by Ángel D’Agostino y su Orquesta Típica with Ángel Vargas in vocals, 1946.

Music: Francisco Troppoli. Lyrics: Agustín Horacio Delamónica.

“It’s all the same, nothing has changed:
the same patio, the same sun,
the same ivy, which like my hope
kept growing in my absence
staying green as ever…

It’s just me who’s come back changed,
carrying all my life’s suffering.
I feel the stab of disillusionment in my chest
as my pained heart bleeds with suffering…

My darling…talk to me!
At least tell me that you hate me.
But don’t just stand there silent and indifferent,
because your frigidity is killing me…

Tell me all your woes—
come on, don’t harbor such resentment for me!
I need the warmth of your endearments,
of your caresses, of your love.

I’ve come back too late
to be able to comfort you.
I’m carrying this weight on my conscience:
knowing that you’ve never
been able to forgive me…

Only now do I understand all the pain
that my abandonment caused you…
You have suffered so much! The wrinkles drawn
on your face are the traces
of your weeping and your sorrow.”

Translation: Derrick Del Pilar.

More Argentine Tango lyrics

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Ramón Collazo, Argentine Tango musician and composer.

“Agua florida” by Ángel D’Agostino y su Orquesta Típica with Ángel Vargas in vocals, 1941.

“Agua florida” by Ángel D’Agostino y su Orquesta Típica with Ángel Vargas in vocals, 1941.

Ramón Collazo, Argentine Tango musician and composer.

Ramón Collazo

Pianist and composer (25 January 1901 – 16 July 1981)

His beginnings date back to 1923 as a member of the famous Athenian Uruguayan Student Troupe, performing in Montevideo and Buenos Aires in the best places for recreation.

He conducted a typical orchestra and with it, he recorded on Odeon records. He published in 1967 the book “Historias del bajo”.

Among his compositions, “Agua florida” stands out.

Read more about Ramón Collazo at www.todotango.com

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Alfredo Attadía, Argentine Tango musician and composer.

“Hay que vivirla compadre” by Ángel D’Agostino y su Orquesta Típica with Ángel Vargas in vocals, 1942.

“Hay que vivirla compadre” by Ángel D’Agostino y su Orquesta Típica with Ángel Vargas in vocals, 1942.

Alfredo Attadía, Argentine Tango musician and composer.

Alfredo Attadía

Bandoneonist, composer and leader (9 January 1914 – 30 January 1982)

His main characteristic was his danceable phrasing with a great interpretive force.

Subsequently his definitive consecration took place when he was called by Ángel D’Agostino to join his group as lead bandoneon and arranger.

In his oeuvre as composer, his most important hits were “Tres esquinas” and “Hay que vivirla compadre”, among many others.

Read more about Alfredo Attadía at www.todotango.com

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"Adios arrabal", Argentine Tango music sheet cover.

“Adiós arrabal” by Ángel D’Agostino y su Orquesta Típica with Ángel Vargas in vocals, 1941.

“Adiós arrabal” by Ángel D’Agostino y su Orquesta Típica with Ángel Vargas in vocals, 1941.

Juan Baüer

Pianist, composer and leader (27 November 1897 – 13 September 1952)

Since his childhood, he had been known by the nickname Firpito because he had a liking for the tangos composed by Roberto Firpo.

The latter, on a certain occasion, called him that way.

He became a composer in 1924 and produced many great tangos, like this one.

He started his career working in movie theaters, theaters, and the Uruguayan Sondor records.

Baüer was born in Spain on November 27, 1897. When he was a kid he arrived in Uruguay, Salto, where he grew up and studied.

He passed away in Montevideo on September 13, 1952.

Read more about Juan Baüer at www.todotango.com

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Cuarteto Juan Maglio, Argentine Tango music.

“Un copetín” by Ángel D’Agostino y su Orquesta Típica with Ángel Vargas in vocals, 1941.

“Un copetín” by Ángel D’Agostino y su Orquesta Típica with Ángel Vargas in vocals, 1941.

Cuarteto Juan Maglio, Argentine Tango music.

Juan Maglio Pacho

Bandoneonist, leader and composer (18 November 1881 – 14 July 1934)

Juan Maglio “Pacho” was essential to the acceptance of the bandoneon as a musical instrument of Tango.

Born in 1881, he started to learn to play bandoneon by watching his father play it every day after work.

He would pay attention to the finger positions and then practice them secretly on his home’s roof.

He went to school until the age of 12, when he started to work, first in a mechanic workshop, then as a laborer in different activities, and then in a brickyard.

At the age of 18, he decided to fully head into his vocation: music.

During the years of hard work, he kept practicing, in order to stay in shape for when the opportunity knocks.

He improved notoriously, and from his bandoneon of 35 buttons, moved successively to instruments of 45, 52, 65, 71, and at last, a customized bandoneon of 75 buttons.

Read more about Juan Maglio Pacho and the History of Tango

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