Argentine Tango School

Champagne Tango. Argentine music at Escuela de Tango de Buenos Aires.

“Champagne Tango” by Carlos Di Sarli y su Orquesta Típica, 1958.

Argentine Tango dance classes at Escuela de Tango de Buenos Aires with Marcelo SolisManuel Aróztegui

Pianist and composer

(4 January 1888 – 14 November 1938)

He was an Oriental (Uruguayan) born in Montevideo on January 4, 1888. This is the exact date given by his nephew Bernardo, a pianist, who, besides exhibiting documents, stated that the right spelling of the family name is with “z” and not with “s”. As we found a certain generalized confusion about that, we think we have cleared out the issue.

Héctor Bates and Luis Bates (in La Historia del Tango) mention bibliographic references of the composer we are talking about. We include a summary of them:

«He was a little above one year old when he settled in Buenos Aires with his family. He studied up to third degree in grammar school, because he admitted he used to play truant. He carried out varied trades.

«His devotion for music was born after he heard Pacho who, by that time (1905), played at a café placed on Thames and Guayanas (now Niceto Vega).

«In his spare time he devoted himself to learn music: guitar, mandolin and violin. Finally he chose piano; his first lessons were taught by a hatter named Leopoldo, later he continued with Carlos Hernani Macchi. Continue reading at www.todotango.com...

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"Un lamento", Argentine Tango music sheet cover.

“Un lamento” by Carlos Di Sarli y su Orquesta Típica, 1942.

"Un lamento", Argentine Tango music sheet cover.Graciano De Leone

Bandoneonist, leader, and composer
(16 July 1890 – 21 June 1945)

Even though he was a “fueye” man, the first bucks he got were playing guitar at the Café de las Mercedes in La Boca when teamed up with the bandoneon player Antonio Cacace, widely popular by that time.

This took place until he came to know Arolas in 1909 one evening that he crossed the city to El Abasto area.

They played in numerous backyard balls adding a violinist that played by ear and was known as “El Quijudo”. Now as bandoneon instrumentalist, Arolas himself had passed on to him the music of the first number, a waltz, “Las sirenas” and one by Alfredo Bevilacqua, “Recuerdos de la pampa”.

His beginning with the new instrument was —towards 1910—… Continue reading at www.todotango.com...

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