Argentine Tango School

Marcelo Solis virtual Argentine Tango classes

Argentine Tango group classes

Argentine Tango group classes

Marcelo Solis teaching Argentine Tango group classes

Argentine Tango is a social dance.

It makes sense to practice it in the context of a like-minded community, in which individuals share the common goal of highly aesthetic experience on a dance floor populated by couples dancing to the same song, producing different interpretations that comfortably fit in the same shared space and time.

It is an artistic expression combining individual freedom, smart adaptability, good taste, politeness, wittiness, passion, and care.

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Let’s describe each of these aspects:

  • Individual freedom: Your dance is what only you can do. None can dance for you, nor tell you what to do in the moment of dancing. Your dance is the product of your free choices.
  • Smart adaptability: Even though you are free to do whatever you want, there are factors that require your attention, to which you need to adapt in a way that does not contradict your freedom, without being imposing.
  • Good taste: The limit of your decisions is nothing other than aesthetics.
  • Politeness: Because you are not alone on the dance floor, kindness and politeness are virtues that make you a good dancer.
  • Wittiness: In any social situation, but particularly in the context of a milonga, your spark adds flavor to a shared experience.
  • Passion: It fuels your dance, makes it come alive. Without it you run the risk of moving mechanically, which will never be dancing.
  • Care: Your partner so close to you, and other couples around you on the dance floor, are human beings. Being considerate is part of what makes you a good dancer.

To develop these aspects of your dance you need to practice Tango with other people, who are not strangers, although there will always be someone new coming to Tango, to whom you will be a link to the community of milongueros.

In group classes we focus on:

  • Social aspects of Tango:
    • Line of dance.
    • Cabeceo (invitation to dance making eye contact).
    • How the music is played in the milongas.
    • What to do after your dance ends.
  • Tango technique exercises.
  • Tango patterns and footwork: from basic to complex.
Eventually, we will organize milongas where you will be able to put into practice what you’ve learned.
We are committed to favor the development of a community of likeminded individuals who see Tango as a way to become better examples of human beings.

Neither group classes nor private lessons alone will make you a good dancer. You need both.

If you take only private lessons, you make Tango a private relationship with your maestro, which is not enough to understand what is Tango, and make you a milonguero/a.
 
If you only take group classes, you are not going to get deep enough into the fine details and the profundity of Tango to make you a good dancer.
To dance Tango you must be a good dancer.

Join our group classes

Marcelo Solis dancing Argentine Tango with Sofia

Private lessons

Virtual lessons available

In private lessons our goal is to share with you the powerful and profound beauty of Tango, as it is a jewel that needs to be passed as part of the best of our human nature.
 
During private lessons we focus on:
  • Good, relaxed posture.
  • Awareness about your body, surrounding space, and your partner’s presence.
  • A nice embrace that connects you to your dance partner.
  • Musical sense: how to listen to Tango music.
  • Moving interpreting the music:
    • Walking.
    • Walking with your partner.
    • Pausing.
    • Changing weight.
  • Footwork and technique.
  • Basic Argentine Tango patterns.
  • More complex patterns and combinations.

Lessons are 50 minutes long and will be booked after payment is received.

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Start learning Argentine Tango:

Watch, listen and read…

 

Argentine Tango dance classes online.

Virtual classes

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Marcelo Solis teaches Argentine Tango private lessons

Argentine Tango private lessons

Argentine Tango private lessons

Marcelo Solís teaching a virtual Argentine Tango lesson

Imagine Learning Tango in its Golden Era…

If you had lived in Buenos Aires, or another city along the bank of Rio de la Plata, in the 1930s, 40s, and 50s, you would have danced Tango.

You would have learned from your relatives and friends.
You would have seen them practicing at home, and they may have taken you and tried to dance with you, given you some instruction, and in doing so integrated you into the culture of Tango, which was part of the culture of that geographic area at the time.

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In your teenage years, you would have gone to “practicas”, Argentine Tango practice gatherings in your neighborhood, where experienced dancers would help you improve your dance.

Money was not involved in this transference of knowledge, beyond paying the club fee at the facility where the practica took place.

The system functioned based on familiar connections and on your interest and commitment to dance well:

if you were committed to improving, you would get more practice and more precise explanations on details, and get to practice more complex dance patterns.

Your eventual connection to the milongas and the community of dancers who were regulars there was rooted at the practicas in your neighborhood.

A relative or friend you make at practicas would take you to your first milonga, and over time help you to integrate.

El Cachafaz with Carmencita Calderón dancing Argentine Tango

On the other hand, there were Argentine Tango maestros, to whom those, outside of the neighborhoods of Buenos Aires and other cities, upper-class citizens or foreigners, would approach for classes.

These maestros were great dancers themselves. 
We know who they were:
Among others.

In the 1960s, there was a gentleman called Gaeta, who taught Tango by mail, copying the idea from Arthur Murray, and would send you paper patterns to place on the floor to guide your footwork.

However, I don’t know anyone in the milongas who learned this way…

How to learn to dance Tango today?

In our private lessons we combine elements of the practicas, tutoring, observing, and dancing with you, with the more straight forward dance lesson mode of the maestros.
 
The first approach is necessary because Tango is a culture, as shown at the practicas, and the lesson mode is necessary too because we don’t live along the bank of Rio de la Plata in the 1930s, 40s, or 50s.

Learn more about the History of Tango

Our goal is to share with you the powerful beauty of Tango, as it is a jewel that needs to be passed as part of the best of our human nature.

During private lessons we focus on:

  • Good, relaxed posture.
  • Awareness about your body, surrounding space, and your partner’s presence.
  • A nice embrace that connects you to your dance partner.
  • Musical sense: how to listen to Tango music.
  • Moving interpreting the music:
    • Walking.
    • Walking with your partner.
    • Pausing.
    • Changing weight.
  • Footwork and technique.
  • Basic Argentine Tango patterns.
  • More complex patterns and combinations.
Also, we introduce you to the essential socio-cultural aspects of Tango:
  • The milongas where you will dance.
  • Códigos of the milongas (etiquette).
  • Tango music and the Orquesta Típicas of the Golden Era.
  • Historical background of Argentine Tango.

We are confident in your ability to become a great dancer.

Our teaching method and information we share with you will guide you to become a great dancer, a true milonguero or milonguera.
We know you will share our love for Tango.

The duty of a Tango maestro is to introduce you to the milongas and help you to be part of this community.

Neither group classes nor private lessons alone will make you a good dancer. You need both.
If you take only private lessons, you make Tango a private relationship with your maestro, which is not enough to understand what is Tango, and make you a milonguero/a.
 
If you only take group classes, you are not going to get deep enough into the fine details and the profundity of Tango to make you a good dancer.

To dance Tango you must be a good dancer.

Book your private lesson

Start learning Argentine Tango:

Watch, listen and read…

 

Argentine Tango dance classes online.

Virtual classes

Online

See schedule:

“Gallo ciego” by Osvaldo Pugliese y su Orquesta Típica, 1959.

“Gallo ciego” by Osvaldo Pugliese y su Orquesta Típica, 1959.

Agustín Bardi, Argentine Tango musician and composer.

Agustín Bardi

Violinist, pianist and composer (13 August 1884 – 21 April 1941)

Agustín Bardi has very deservedly received the title of “composer of musicians.”

The excellent quality of his works always had the recognized admiration of all professional musicians without exception.

The musical elaboration of his tangos allows the showcasing of the Orquestas Típicas in any of its interpretative modalities.

Bardi’s tangos were not written to be played in the manner of primitive ensembles, without harmonic concerns or aesthetic interest in achieving greater musical enhancement.

Read more about Agustín Bardi and the History of Tango

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Jorge Vidal, Argentine Tango singer.

“Un baile a beneficio” by Osvaldo Pugliese y su Orquesta Típica with Jorge Vidal in vocals, 1950.

“Un baile a beneficio” by Osvaldo Pugliese y su Orquesta Típica with Jorge Vidal in vocals, 1950.

Jorge Vidal, Argentine Tango singer.

Jorge Vidal

Singer and composer (12 August 1924 – 14 September 2010)

“From an early age I had a clear position towards life, concerning social and political matters. And I was very lucky, God was always on my side. There were many bitter times, characteristic of the humans, but I was putting them in a corner.”

“Man should always have the interest to continue ahead and to keep on fighting. When he loses his capacity of astonishment, when there is nothing that may draw his attention, when he no longer has an interest that allows him to keep on living with enthusiasm and he doesn’t have strength to improve, well, he’d better kill yourself.”

“With Pugliese I learned, among so many things, to have respect for rhythm. I was very successful alongside him”. 

Read more about Jorge Vidal at www.todotango.com

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Wilhelm Grosz, Austrian musician and composer.

“Isla de Capri” by Osvaldo Fresedo y su Orquesta Típica with Roberto Ray in vocals, 1935.

“Isla de Capri” by Osvaldo Fresedo y su Orquesta Típica with Roberto Ray in vocals, 1935.

Wilhelm Grosz, Austrian composer, pianist, and conductor. Portrait.

Wilhelm Grosz

Austrian composer, pianist, and conductor (11 August 1894 – 10 December 1939)

Wilhelm Grosz was able to apply a considerable melodic gift to setting the lyrics of popular songs, some of which became international successes.

Among them: “Isla de Capri”.

Grosz’s classical compositions include three operas, two ballets, incidental music for three plays, scores for a number of films, orchestral works, a Symphonic Dance for piano and orchestra, chamber music, piano pieces and songs.

Read more about Wilhelm Grosz at wikipedia.org

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Listen and buy:

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More Argentine Tango music selected for you:

We have lots more music and history

How to dance to this music?

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