“Gallo ciego” by Osvaldo Pugliese y su Orquesta Típica, 1959.

“Gallo ciego” by Osvaldo Pugliese y su Orquesta Típica, 1959.

Agustín Bardi, Argentine Tango musician and composer.

Agustín Bardi

Violinist, pianist and composer (13 August 1884 – 21 April 1941)

Agustín Bardi has very deservedly received the title of “composer of musicians.”

The excellent quality of his works always had the recognized admiration of all professional musicians without exception.

The musical elaboration of his tangos allows the showcasing of the Orquestas Típicas in any of its interpretative modalities.

Bardi’s tangos were not written to be played in the manner of primitive ensembles, without harmonic concerns or aesthetic interest in achieving greater musical enhancement.

Read more about Agustín Bardi and the History of Tango

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Jorge Vidal, Argentine Tango singer.

“Un baile a beneficio” by Osvaldo Pugliese y su Orquesta Típica with Jorge Vidal in vocals, 1950.

“Un baile a beneficio” by Osvaldo Pugliese y su Orquesta Típica with Jorge Vidal in vocals, 1950.

Jorge Vidal, Argentine Tango singer.

Jorge Vidal

Singer and composer (12 August 1924 – 14 September 2010)

“From an early age I had a clear position towards life, concerning social and political matters. And I was very lucky, God was always on my side. There were many bitter times, characteristic of the humans, but I was putting them in a corner.”

“Man should always have the interest to continue ahead and to keep on fighting. When he loses his capacity of astonishment, when there is nothing that may draw his attention, when he no longer has an interest that allows him to keep on living with enthusiasm and he doesn’t have strength to improve, well, he’d better kill yourself.”

“With Pugliese I learned, among so many things, to have respect for rhythm. I was very successful alongside him”. 

Read more about Jorge Vidal at www.todotango.com

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Wilhelm Grosz, Austrian musician and composer.

“Isla de Capri” by Osvaldo Fresedo y su Orquesta Típica with Roberto Ray in vocals, 1935.

“Isla de Capri” by Osvaldo Fresedo y su Orquesta Típica with Roberto Ray in vocals, 1935.

Wilhelm Grosz, Austrian composer, pianist, and conductor. Portrait.

Wilhelm Grosz

Austrian composer, pianist, and conductor (11 August 1894 – 10 December 1939)

Wilhelm Grosz was able to apply a considerable melodic gift to setting the lyrics of popular songs, some of which became international successes.

Among them: “Isla de Capri”.

Grosz’s classical compositions include three operas, two ballets, incidental music for three plays, scores for a number of films, orchestral works, a Symphonic Dance for piano and orchestra, chamber music, piano pieces and songs.

Read more about Wilhelm Grosz at wikipedia.org

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Marcelo and Miranda dancing Argentine Tango in San Francisco

Three questions regarding Argentine Tango

Three questions regarding Argentine Tango

Marcelo and Miranda dancing Argentine Tango in San Francisco Union Square, July 2019.

We are curious…

We’d like to know how that magic spark which ignited your passion for Tango started.

Please respond to these three simple questions and I will reply back to you telling you my own story.

Also, if you want to share with us more about Tango and you, or you have any question, please let us know:

Contact us

Thank you so much!

Argentine Tango dance classes online.

Virtual classes

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Argentine Tango dancing. Marcelo Solis at milonga. Levels' classes.

About virtual Argentine Tango classes and private lessons online

About virtual Argentine Tango classes and private lessons online

Argentine Tango dancing. Marcelo Solis at milonga.

Our virtual classes online work on the assumption that it is a temporary measure to keep us engaged and improving, having always in mind the ultimate goal of dancing embraced again sooner or later.

Marcelo Solis teaching Argentine Tango virtual classes online

I have to admit that I did not have much confidence in this channel for Tango instruction, but online classes turned out -unexpectedly- to be a wonderful way to observe in detail our students dancing, and a powerful tool to organize the presentation of our knowledge to them.

Of course it doesn’t appeal to everyone, since many seek physical contact in Tango, and/or are more incline to learn in a rather kinesthetic manner.

However, even though these physical/in-person/kinesthetic aspects are what Tango has of unique, offering them in subtle and poetic ways, attracting and seducing us to its adoption and incorporation into the core of our lives, we will always need the aid of visual presentation, clear explanation, meticulous observation and distanced objectiveness that are a fundamental part of the Tango instruction, but which are amplified in the case of the technology that we are obliged to use now. 

Marcelo Solis Argentine Tango with Sofia Pellicciaro

As your Tango teachers (and here I ask myself about the relation between teaching Tango and life coaching), we strongly advise you not to miss this opportunity.

Learning Tango is hard, frustrating some times and humbling often, and all this may become even worst learning in virtual classes… or maybe not, and perhaps you’ll find, like I did, that it is wonderful, that it is powerful, and that thanks to a certain sense of “estrangement” it helps you to understand things differently, making you pay attention to aspects often passed on at the in-person classes, and facilitating you to make your communications more clear and efficient. 

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All of these apply to either students and instructors.

Here we want to share with you what we consider important for you in the process of virtual Argentine Tango instruction online:

For students:

  • Be open minded.

    Definitely the online class will be light years away from in-person classes.

    However, if you come into the classes avoiding the expectation of similarity with, or make up for the in-person class, you will be much more prepared to take advantage of what only virtual classes can offer to you, and are only on-the-side aspects at the in-person classes.

    For instance, since your teacher cannot dance with you or physically move you, he or she will break down the movements into its most elemental constituents, helping you to fully understand what movements and how to execute them, in a way that, being more abstract, will provide you with the opportunity to practice the move in a “timeless” and “spaceless” fashion, a more thoughtful way, and eventually a more aware way.

  • Let the experience teach you.

    Since this is going to be a novel way to learn Argentine Tango, you will find on your path problems that will be only resolved with later corrections.

    For instance, your floor may not be the best for dancing Tango, or your furniture gets in your way, or your internet connection is too slow.

    All these are problems that get fixed much more easily than fixing your Tango. Go ahead and move your furniture, look at hardware stores online for plastic tiles that you can put over your carpet, call your internet provider (now they are offering discounts on upgrades).

    At each class you will get a better set up for your learning environment. And since we are a community, please share your questions regarding solutions to these challenges. I like to ask my students how they are fixing their particular problems, so I may be in the possession of an answer for you already.

  • Pay attention.

    Avoid distractions. If you are not alone at home, let your relatives and spouses know that you’ll be “away” for one hour.

    Even though you are physically at home, you are virtually at your Tango class, and let me tell you, this “virtuality” is very real. You need to be fully engaged in your class. You won’t be able to be in two places simultaneously.

    Even if it is your living room or garage, it is the classroom for the duration of the lesson.

  • Ask questions.

    Do not hesitate. Your instructors need constant feedback to know that the communication is effective.

    Let them know you did not understand something, or you could not see it, or whatever passes your mind that is related to what is worked on during the class.

    Your teacher has modified his/her teaching style to the online channel, so you need to change your usual learning actitudes. Even technical questions related to the technology used for the class are admissible questions. Remember that.

For teachers:

  • Plan your class.

    You will need to adapt your teaching style to the TV or computer screen’s two dimensional space.

    Keep in mind that your student needs to see you all the time. That is why turns are particularly challenging to teach in the virtual class set up.

    My solution to this problem is to segment the turns in its constituents, in order to keep training a fundamental element of Tango, avoiding making students having to look at the screen while they turn away.

  • Have the right tools.

    Supply yourself with a good camera and a good microphone. Since your communications will be exclusively visual and auditory, you need the best tools that you can provide yourself.

    I’ve been using a mini iPad for the camera and a wireless microphone. I like to show the moves having students behind me, so I am doing the with the camera at my back, so the microphone has been essential to make the sound clear even while I am talking looking away fro the camera.

    Although I have to say the iPad and Zoom (the video conference system that we use) are very sensitive in picking up the sound waves.

  • Have good lighting.

    I am using all the lights of my home studio pointed at me, and added an extra lamp with a styrofoam board to reflect light on my face when I get close to the camera.

  • Use screen sharing to play your music.

    This will make your students hear to the music you choose for your class with much better sound quality than if you make it stream from your microphone.

  • Keeping things in order.

    Use the waiting room feature and close the admission at ten minutes into the class to avoid interruptions.

    You can also have an assistant to work as admin. That is my case but it may not be yours.

Marcelo Solis and Miranda Lindelow performing at Union Square in San Francisco, July 2019.

This is what I have to say for now. Please let me know if you have any questions. I will be happy to answer.

The pandemic has demonstrated how much we need to act as a community, and I am very happy to see that everyone in the Tango community worldwide has that attitude.

¡Viva el Tango!

Long life to Tango!

Here are some examples of what we have being working lately in our virtual classes online:











Learn to dance Argentine Tango at our virtual classes

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