Tag: tango music

Enrique Cadícamo. Música en Escuela de Tango de Buenos Aires.

Enrique Cadícamo. Argentine music at Escuela de Tango de Buenos Aires.Enrique Cadícamo

Poet, lyricist, composer, writer and theatral writer
(15 July 1900 – 3 December 1999)

“An everlasting boy —wrote León Benarós—, Cadícamo seems to live counter clockwise. He keeps his hair intact, of a pale blond color, that becomes square at the back of his neck and rather long in a juvenile fashion… He wears light-colored ties —once we saw him with one of a subtle yellow color— and his sports coats add him youth. He wants to forget about time because he knows that time —“that dark enemy that sucks our blood”, according to Baudelaire’s lines—, feeds on our illusions, on our life…” Continue reading.

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Anibal Troilo. Argentine music at Escuela de tango de Buenos Aires.Aníbal Troilo

Bandoneon player, leader and composer.
(11 July 1914 – 19 May 1975)

He was spellbound by the bandoneon when he heard its sound at cafés in his neighborhood. He was ten when he persuaded his mother into buying one for him. They got it at 140 pesos of that time, to be paid in 14 stallments, but after the fourth payment, the shopkeeper died and no one ever claimed for the rest. With that instrument he played almost during his whole lifetime. Continue reading.

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Charlo. Argentine music at Escuela de Tango de Buenos Aires.Charlo

Argentine Tango singer, musician, pianist, actor and composer.
(7 July 1906 – 30 October 1990)

In his important work as composer of rare ability to musically express human drama and romantic rapture, the following tunes stand out : with lyrics by the film maker Luis César Amadori, the tangos “Cobardía”, “Rencor” and “Tormento”; with José González Castillo, “El viejo vals”, a piece of rare perfection, unparalleled in Charlo’s rendition; with José María Contursi, “Sin lágrimas”; with Cátulo Castillo, “Sin ella”. “Fueye” and the beautiful waltz “Tu pálida voz” with lyrics by Homero Manzi. And with Cadícamo, besides “Ave de paso”, three tangos of high value, but very different from each other, stand out: “Rondando tu esquina”, “Viejas alegrías” and “La barranca”. Continue reading.

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San Francisco Milonga
Nowadays the word “milonga” has two meanings:
  1. A particular rhythm and musical genre.
  2. A Tango dance party.

San Francisco Bay Area Milongas. Dance Argentine Tango.

This word evolved from the West African Bantu language, in which “malonga” means “word”, and “milonga” is the plural of “malonga”: “words”

It is hypothesized by historians that the African population of Rio de La Plata used this term in relation to the “payada”, a musical genre in which two individuals compete by playing guitar and improvising verses, asking each other questions. The rhythm of this genre evolved to the rhythm we now know as milonga.

When the dance of Tango appeared, it was a technique of partner’s dance used to dance any danceable rhythm. Waltz was the most popular at the time, but soon the milonga rhythm was identified as a better fit for that particular dance technique.
As this rhythm, and the way of dancing to it, grew in popularity, “milonga” also became the name of the gathering and the place where this dance was practiced. The word “Tango” was initially a synonym of the word “milonga”, and they later became the name of two differentiated rhythms. Tango dance parties and the location where it is danced kept the name of “milonga”, as well as its crowd of participants, “milongueros”.

Milongas, meaning “Tango dance parties”, have been happening for more than 130 years. During this time, milongas developed a set of codes that cultivate efficiency, maximizing the possibility of great dancers appearing, and allowing the continuity of its existence as a precious cultural gem.

At Escuela de Tango de Buenos Aires we provide you with a complete Argentine Tango experience, and Milongas (dance parties) are an essential aspect.
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Let’s dance! We invite you to enjoy our classes and milongas.

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Oscar Larroca & Alfredo De Angelis. Argentine music at Escuela de Tango de Buenos Aires.Oscar Larroca

Singer
(5 July 1922 – 26 August 1976)

One of the idols of the time, the vocalist Julio Martel, who with Carlos Dante had teamed-up the most successful duo of the 40s, split with the Alfredo De Angelis Orchestra. The violinist Víctor Braña, attracted by the color of Larroca’s baritone-like voice, his good intonation and his diction, plus his good-looking appearance, introduced him to De Angelis who hired him immediately.

Oscar quickly adapted himself to the style of the orchestra. A good blending with Dante takes place and so a harmonious duo with good intonation is born.

They made their debut on Radio El Mundo at the tango program with the greatest audience, Glostora tango club, on April 1, 1951. Continue reading.

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