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“Almagro” by Alfredo de Ángelis y su Orquesta Típica with Oscar Larroca in vocals, 1951.

Oscar Larroca & Alfredo De Angelis. Argentine music at Escuela de Tango de Buenos Aires.Oscar Larroca

Singer
(5 July 1922 – 26 August 1976)

One of the idols of the time, the vocalist Julio Martel, who with Carlos Dante had teamed-up the most successful duo of the 40s, split with the Alfredo De Angelis Orchestra. The violinist Víctor Braña, attracted by the color of Larroca’s baritone-like voice, his good intonation and his diction, plus his good-looking appearance, introduced him to De Angelis who hired him immediately.

Oscar quickly adapted himself to the style of the orchestra. A good blending with Dante takes place and so a harmonious duo with good intonation is born.

They made their debut on Radio El Mundo at the tango program with the greatest audience, Glostora tango club, on April 1, 1951. Continue reading.

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argentine tango, Buenos Aires, classes, dancing, investigation, milonguero, philosophy, san francisco bay area, tango music

“Silbar de boyero” by Osvaldo Pugliese y su Orquesta Típica with Roberto Chanel in vocals, 1944.

Osvaldo Pugliese and Roberto Chanel. Argentine music at Escuela de Tango de Buenos Aires.Roberto Chanel & Osvaldo Pugliese

The singer himself tells us: «I always got along very well with Pugliese in spite of his political ideas.»
The researcher Nélida Rouchetto described him this way: «With his nasal sound, his canyengue and his common man’s diction he kept alive the popular roots that gave rise to the city music. It was Chanel who identified himself like an orchestra instrument, in the manner of a viola, as can be verified since his first recording». Continue reading.

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Milongueando with Suzanne

Dancing Argentine Tango

My desire to get better was shaped through decades of patient learning, careful observation of dancers who inspired and guided me, and passionate dancing in milongas, to challenge others to dance better and to be challenged to better myself. Learn to dance!

argentine tango, Buenos Aires, classes, dancing, lessons, milonguero, philosophy, san francisco bay area, tango music

“Sobre el pucho” by Juan D’Arienzo y su Orquesta Típica with Héctor Mauré, 1941.

José González Castillo

Poet and lyricist
(25 January 1885 – 22 October 1937)

Lyrics for tango were born around 1914, based on those ones conceived by Pascual Contursi that year and the following years (“De vuelta al bulín”, “Ivette”, “Flor de fango”, “Mi noche triste (Lita)”), and they were growing strong very slowly. So much so that in Carlos Gardel’s repertoire tangos were, until the next decade, a rare bird. There was not even a notion of how to sing a tango, a standard that Gardel was gradually establishing after 1922. That was, precisely, the year José González Castillo truly disembarked in the genre with the lyrics of “Sobre el pucho”, after Sebastián Piana’s music, which was introduced at the talent contest organized by Tango cigarettes.

José Gobello (Crónica general del tango, Editorial Fraterna) stated about this work that, with it «some novelties broke into tango that the tango literary work of Homero Manzi would later turn into true constants. By the way, Pompeya («Un callejón en Pompeya/y un farolito plateando el fango…»); later, the description of the neighborhood and, soon, the enumeration as a descriptive procedure».

But in those lyrics there is something else, metaphor, that springs up in the memory that the malevo devotes to his lost love «…tu inconstancia loca/me arrebató de tu boca/como pucho que se tira/ cuando ya/ni sabor ni aroma da». It is clear that González Castillo was a forerunner, and also that other later lyricists were who deepened those trends. Continue reading.

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Dance Argentine Tango with Marcelo Solis at Escuela de Tango de Buenos Aires Dance Argentine Tango with Marcelo Solis at Escuela de Tango de Buenos Aires

Walking, dancing, body and words

FeetHumans are the only known beings that walk upright. Our walk is as characteristic as our rational mind. They are related.

You can know about other people by looking at the way they walk. You can know yourself better if you can see yourself and see the way you walk. Others can know about you by paying attention at the way you walk.

You can improve yourself by improving the way you walk.

How is the life of an average American affected by the lack of walking that is becoming more and more a characteristic of the “American way of life”?

This is a very “American” problem, because the rest of the world walks, and a lot.

Tango has made an art of walking in company, with your partner, on the dance floor full of other couples.

Where else in real life would you walk as proud, happy, honestly and powerful, besides the dance floor of a true milonga?

Body and words:

Body and wordsHow to talk about something without knowing it? Do we really know our body? Perhaps the ignorance of our body produces the ignorance of the materiality of the world in general, of its reality.

Learning to dance is as important as learning to talk.

Is it possible to learn to speak without the participation of another human being in the process? Would it be possible one day in the future for a baby to learn how to talk from machines?

Speech is transmitted only with the participation of our body, and when our body teaches others how to talk, we dance.

Language is an aspect of dance. A word that is not danced – that does not have the support of a body – is destructive, evil, anguishing, a dead end, conducive to perish, not alive.

True dancers do not talk too much.

Resources:

http://www5.uva.es/agora/revista/2/agora2_12_mariacuesta.pdf

http://www.nyu.edu/classes/bkg/tourist/feet.pdf

http://youtu.be/1l_4OW_Ir7M

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lVPLIuBy9CY

http://on.ted.com/babybrain

I am looking forward to seeing you and dancing with you soon,

Marcelo Solís

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