Tag Archives: Tango

“Una noche de garufa” by Septimino de Argentino Galván Los Astros del Tango, 1959.

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Eduardo Arolas. Escuela de Tango de Buenos Aires. Learn to dance.

Learn to dance Argentine Tango at Escuela de Tango de Buenos Aires. Marcelo Solis teaches you at the San Francisco Bay AreaEduardo Arolas: El Tigre del bandoneón

Bandoneonist, composer and leader
(24 February 1892 – 29 September 1924)
Every tango lover has a personal vision towards the artists’ values, and that is all right, our taste and personal experiences define us in the choice of ones or others.
Certainly, when we talk about tango as song, there is an unanimous agreement in the incomparable figure of Carlos Gardel, something that does not happen when the opinion is about orchestras or the rest of the musicians or singers.
The case of Eduardo Arolas, is another exception, his extraordinary talent as composer, places him one a rank above the rest, what is a merit even greater if we take into account that in his time the major tango creators appeared. Let us remember musicians of the category of Agustín Bardi, Vicente Greco, Arturo De Bassi, Juan Carlos Cobián, Roberto Firpo, among so many others.
So Gardel and Arolas are, in my opinion, the basement of modern tango, the former, born French and porteño (Argentine from Buenos Aires) by adoption, the latter, Argentine with French parents.
Gifted with an incredible melodic creativity, he stepped into the musical environment as a modest player of guitar, his first instrument, introduced by his friend Ricardo González, (Muchila).
But the bandoneon will be responsible for his consecration and the faithful witness of his genius and his tormented life. Continue reading.

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First week classes

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Learn Argentine Tango in the San Francisco Bay Area at Escuela de Tango de Buenos Aires with Marcelo Solis

Here some videos to review the exercises made in class.

Try these exercises and please let us know if you have any questions.

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History of Tango video– Part 8: Roberto Firpo and the acceptance of the piano in the Orquesta Típica

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Firpo composer. Learn to dance Argentine Tango at Escuela de Tango de Buenos Aires with Marcelo Solis in the San Francisco Bay Area. Classes for all levels. Private and group instruction.

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“La Trilla” by Carlos Di Sarli y su Orquesta Típica, 1940.

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Carlos Di Sarli. Learn to dance Argentine Tango at Escuela de Tango de Buenos Aires, with Marcelo Solis, in the San Francisco Bay Area.

Learn to dance Argentine Tango. Marcelo Solis teaches you at Escuela de Tango de Buenos Aires, in the beautiful San Francisco Bay Area.Carlos Di Sarli: El Señor del Tango

Pianist, leader and composer
(7 January 1903 – 12 January 1960)
He, as nobody else, knew how to combine the rhythmic cadence of tango with a harmonic structure, apparently simple, but full of nuances and subtleties.
He was not enrolled for any of the two streams of his time. His was neither a traditional orchestra, styled after Roberto Firpo or Francisco Canaro nor a follower of the De Caro renewal.
Di Sarli imposed a seal of his own; a different musical profile, which remained, unaltered throughout his prolonged career.
In the beginning, his sextet reveals us the influence of Osvaldo Fresedo. And certainly, I think there would have never been a Di Sarli had not existed a Fresedo. But, only as necessary forerunner of a style that, with time, would become a pure model with its own and differentiated nature.
He was a talented pianist, maybe one of the most important, who conducted his orchestra from his instrument, with which he mastered the synchrony and the performance of the outfit.
In his orchestral scheme there were not instrumental solos, the bandoneon section sang at times the melody, but it had an essentially rhythmic and danceable role. Only the violin was showcased in an extremely delicate way, on a brief solo or on a counter melody. Continue reading.

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“En un beso la vida” by Carlos Di Sarli y su Orquesta Típica with Roberto Rufino, 1940.

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Learn to dance Argentine Tango. Escuela de Tango de Buenos Aires. Marcelo Solis. San Francisco Bay Area.

Argentine Tango dance. Learn with Marcelo Solis. He teaches at Escuela de Tango de Buenos Aires. San Francisco Bay Area.Roberto Rufino

Singer and composer
(6 January 1922 – 24 February 1999)

Listening to Roberto Rufino when he sang “María” or “La novia ausente” or “Malena” or any of the tangos he had chosen for his repertoire, was to realize that that tango was unraveling little by little and that the words sprang up separately, without forsaking the whole that gathered them, with the proper strength they had to have in their context.
Rufino was that: a storyteller, a phraser, an interpreter that perfectly knew which was the meaning of what he was singing.
He was born on January 6, 1922, on 753 Agüero Street —in the heart of the neighborhood of el Abasto—, son of Lorenzo Rufino and Agustina Guirin, although in his birth certificate is written the day he was filed on the records, on the 8th day of that same month and year. A little bit yonder, on Agüero and Guardia Vieja Streets, the café O’Rondeman was placed, where Carlos Gardel attempted his early songs. A premonition? Maybe, because Rufino as well started at the old café of his neighborhood, which still was run by the Traverso brothers. But there is a further coincidence: in the same year, 1935, his father and Gardel died. And in 1936, a few days after the cortege which was mourning Carlitos to his final abode had passed along Corrientes street, El pibe del Abasto —as he was called since the early days at O’Rondeman, made his professional debut; he was also called El pibe Terremoto— at the Café El Nacional, as vocalist of the Francisco Rosse typical orchestra, to switch, a little bit later, to Petit Salón, with Antonio Bonavena orchestra, composer of “Pájaro ciego” and uncle of the would-be boxer.
But we are still in the singer’s prehistory. Continue reading.

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