Tag: class

Marcelo Solis at Escuela de Tango de Buenos Aires - Marcelo Solis

Argentine Tango 8-week training program is starting on…

Argentine Tango 8-week training program is starting on…

Argentine Tango 8-week training program is starting on…

      • San Jose: Next series starting on April 27, 2020 and every consecutive Monday at 7 pm beginners and 8 pm intermediates (no class 5/25 Memorial Day).

      • San Francisco: Next series starting on April 29, 2020 and every consecutive Wednesday at 7 pm beginners and 8 pm intermediates.

      • Lafayette: Next series starting on May 1, 2020 and every consecutive Friday at 8 pm beginners and 9 pm intermediates.

We will work on:

  • Correct posture, walk and the concept of lead and follow.
  • Connection with the partner and the floor.
  • Understanding the music. Basics of social etiquette and navigation in the context of Argentine Tango.

Next classes:

  • San Francisco: Next series starting on June 24, 2020 and every consecutive Wednesday at 7 pm beginners and 8 pm intermediates.
  • Lafayette: Next series starting on June 26, 2020 and every consecutive Friday at 8 pm beginners and 9 pm intermediates (no class 7/3 Independence Day observed).
  • San Jose: Next series starting on June 29, 2020 and every consecutive Monday at 7 pm beginners and 8 pm intermediates.

Registration closes 24 hours prior to the beginning of the series.

Register now

Argentine Tango private lessons with Marcelo Solis

Private lessons

Absolutely your main way of learning Argentine Tango!

  • At our private lessons we work intensely on foundations, rhythm, musicality and connection with partner. We design a program according to your own goals and requirements.

  • While group classes are necessary to work on the social aspects of this beautiful art form, during private lessons we focus on the specific details of your dance which are important in achieving your goal of being a great dancer, a true milonguera or milonguero.

  • Private lessons are at San Francisco, San Jose and Lafayette locations.

Book your private lessons

Marcelo Solis dancing Argentine Tango in Buenos Aires among other great milongueros

Travel To Buenos Aires with us!

Allow us to guide you through Buenos Aires and Tango

  • Highlighting how this beautiful City, Porteños (the people who live in Buenos Aires), architecture, art, history, cuisine, and way of life are intimately connected to Tango music and dance.

  • The format of this tour seamlessly integrates you into the life of a Porteño/a, allowing you the opportunity to experience all of the components of Tango from the passionate point of view of a milonguero/a. 

  • Tango is love and respect. We are eager to share this love and and respect with you, and demonstrate how through proper guidance and instruction, you can realize your dream of dancing Tango in Buenos Aires.

A typical day in Buenos Aires with our tour:

  1. We meet at late morning for City tours and having lunch.
  2. Afternoon and early evenings classes.
  3. Milongas every night.

We leave the mornings an early afternoon free for any private lessons you may like to take while in Buenos Aires.

Join us in our next trip!

 

Argentine Tango Technique 9: Forward ochos with Marcelo Solis.

Argentine Tango dance technique 9: Forward ocho

  • From this forward step to the next position going forward, in which you will transfer your weight to this now front foot, your torso is already rotating towards the center of the couple, so the foot that remains behind, by the pull of this torsion, which gets the shape of a spiral, turns your back foot, first, inside edge in contact with the floor, and then, makes it travel next to your sagittal line, to the “collect/inside edge position”.
  • After this “collect/inside edge position”, we research in these possibilities: 1. Forward ocho: Pivot more continuing on the same direction of your stablished rotation and move your free of weight foot forward, aligned with your lower sagittal plane, your torso torquing according to counter body movement, orientating the center of your chest to the central axis of the couple.
 
Argentine Tango technique 7 with Marcelo Solis

Argentine Tango dance technique 7: Walking forward and backward

Argentine Tango dance technique 6. With Marcelo Solis.

Argentine Tango dance technique 6: Forward/backward move

"El choclo". Argentine Music at Escuela de Buenos Aiires.

“El Choclo” by Ángel D’Agostino y su Orquesta Típica with Ángel Vargas in vocals (1941)

Angel Villoldo. Argentine music at Escuela de Tango de Buenos Aires.Ángel Villoldo

Composer and lyricist
(16 February 1861 – 14 October 1919)

He bears the title of Father of Tango, a somewhat exaggerated qualification because there were many circumstances which originated our music. But his influence was so important in the beginnings and its development which made him deserve this designation.

He is the great transformer of the Spanish tanguillos, the cuplés, the habaneras, turning those musics into a River Plate rhythm.

A natural artist, he avoided no activity which enabled him to earn some money for a living. It is said that he was a typographer, circus clown and any other job he was required for.

He was also a cuarteador (a person taking care of an extra horse or joke of oxen for dragging uphill) in the neighborhoods far from downtown. He was a horserider who used to wait for the arrival of a big coach or a streetcar at the bottom of slopes to help them get out of the mud or to go uphill. This meant to fasten the vehicle with a rope tied to his horse and help it in the effort.

With a facility for writing, he devised stanzas for carnival costumed groups and numerous poems and prose writings for well-known magazines of the time: Caras y caretas, Fray Mocho and P.B.T.

All through his work is present the wit sarcasm, and his dialogues were thought for the common man’s tongue and were always referred to real situations in the leasehold houses, the neighborhood and, many times, to love affairs which portrayed the way of speaking and behavior of the lowest social level of our society.

His wit, his facility in speaking, helped him to mix up with payadores and to put forward performances of scarse formality and, sometimes, completely shameless.

Always accompanying himself on guitar, with a harmonica added, he succeeded in telling stories by singing, which encouraged the audiences at the low cafés and joints. Continue reading.

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