Tag: argentine

Marcelo Solis at Escuela de Tango de Buenos Aires - Marcelo Solis

Argentine Tango 8-week training program is starting on…

Argentine Tango 8-week training program is starting on…

Argentine Tango 8-week training program is starting on…

      • San Jose: Next series starting on April 27, 2020 and every consecutive Monday at 7 pm beginners and 8 pm intermediates (no class 5/25 Memorial Day).

      • San Francisco: Next series starting on April 29, 2020 and every consecutive Wednesday at 7 pm beginners and 8 pm intermediates.

      • Lafayette: Next series starting on May 1, 2020 and every consecutive Friday at 8 pm beginners and 9 pm intermediates.

We will work on:

  • Correct posture, walk and the concept of lead and follow.
  • Connection with the partner and the floor.
  • Understanding the music. Basics of social etiquette and navigation in the context of Argentine Tango.

Next classes:

  • San Francisco: Next series starting on June 24, 2020 and every consecutive Wednesday at 7 pm beginners and 8 pm intermediates.
  • Lafayette: Next series starting on June 26, 2020 and every consecutive Friday at 8 pm beginners and 9 pm intermediates (no class 7/3 Independence Day observed).
  • San Jose: Next series starting on June 29, 2020 and every consecutive Monday at 7 pm beginners and 8 pm intermediates.

Registration closes 24 hours prior to the beginning of the series.

Register now

Argentine Tango private lessons with Marcelo Solis

Private lessons

Absolutely your main way of learning Argentine Tango!

  • At our private lessons we work intensely on foundations, rhythm, musicality and connection with partner. We design a program according to your own goals and requirements.

  • While group classes are necessary to work on the social aspects of this beautiful art form, during private lessons we focus on the specific details of your dance which are important in achieving your goal of being a great dancer, a true milonguera or milonguero.

  • Private lessons are at San Francisco, San Jose and Lafayette locations.

Book your private lessons

Marcelo Solis dancing Argentine Tango in Buenos Aires among other great milongueros

Travel To Buenos Aires with us!

Allow us to guide you through Buenos Aires and Tango

  • Highlighting how this beautiful City, Porteños (the people who live in Buenos Aires), architecture, art, history, cuisine, and way of life are intimately connected to Tango music and dance.

  • The format of this tour seamlessly integrates you into the life of a Porteño/a, allowing you the opportunity to experience all of the components of Tango from the passionate point of view of a milonguero/a. 

  • Tango is love and respect. We are eager to share this love and and respect with you, and demonstrate how through proper guidance and instruction, you can realize your dream of dancing Tango in Buenos Aires.

A typical day in Buenos Aires with our tour:

  1. We meet at late morning for City tours and having lunch.
  2. Afternoon and early evenings classes.
  3. Milongas every night.

We leave the mornings an early afternoon free for any private lessons you may like to take while in Buenos Aires.

Join us in our next trip!

 

José Gonzalez Castillo, author of tangos

“Sobre el pucho” by Juan D’Arienzo y su Orquesta Típica with Héctor Mauré in vocals, 1941.

“Sobre el pucho” by Juan D’Arienzo y su Orquesta Típica with Héctor Mauré in vocals, 1941.

José Gonzalez Castillo, author of tangos

José González Castillo

Poet and lyricist (25 January 1885 – 22 October 1937)

Lyrics for tango were born around 1914, based on those ones conceived by Pascual Contursi that year and the following years (“De vuelta al bulín”, “Ivette”, “Flor de fango”, “Mi noche triste (Lita)”), and they were growing strong very slowly.

So much so that in Carlos Gardel’s repertoire tangos were, until the next decade, a rare bird. There was not even a notion of how to sing a tango, a standard that Gardel was gradually establishing after 1922.

That was, precisely, the year José González Castillo truly disembarked in the genre with the lyrics of “Sobre el pucho”, after Sebastián Piana’s music, which was introduced at the talent contest organized by Tango cigarettes.

José Gobello (Crónica general del tango, Editorial Fraterna) stated about this work that, with it «some novelties broke into tango that the tango literary work of Homero Manzi would later turn into true constants. By the way, Pompeya («Un callejón en Pompeya/y un farolito plateando el fango…»); later, the description of the neighborhood and, soon, the enumeration as a descriptive procedure».

But in those lyrics there is something else, metaphor, that springs up in the memory that the malevo devotes to his lost love «…tu inconstancia loca/me arrebató de tu boca/como pucho que se tira/ cuando ya/ni sabor ni aroma da». It is clear that González Castillo was a forerunner, and also that other later lyricists were who deepened those trends.

Read more about José González Castillo at www.todotango.com

Listen and buy:

  • Amazon music

  • iTunes music

  • Spotify

We have lots more music and history

Ver este artículo en español

Learn to dance Argentine Tango

Carlos Di Sarli. History of Tango. Escuela de Tango de Buenos Aires. Marcelo Solis

“La Trilla” by Carlos Di Sarli y su Orquesta Típica, 1940.

Learn to dance Argentine Tango. Marcelo Solis teaches you at Escuela de Tango de Buenos Aires, in the beautiful San Francisco Bay Area.Carlos Di Sarli: El Señor del Tango

Pianist, leader and composer

(7 January 1903 – 12 January 1960)

He, as nobody else, knew how to combine the rhythmic cadence of tango with a harmonic structure, apparently simple, but full of nuances and subtleties.

He was not enrolled for any of the two streams of his time. His was neither a traditional orchestra, styled after Roberto Firpo or Francisco Canaro nor a follower of the De Caro renewal.

Di Sarli imposed a seal of his own; a different musical profile, which remained, unaltered throughout his prolonged career.

In the beginning, his sextet reveals us the influence of Osvaldo Fresedo. And certainly, I think there would have never been a Di Sarli had not existed a Fresedo. But, only as necessary forerunner of a style that, with time, would become a pure model with its own and differentiated nature.

He was a talented pianist, maybe one of the most important, who conducted his orchestra from his instrument, with which he mastered the synchrony and the performance of the outfit.

In his orchestral scheme there were not instrumental solos, the bandoneon section sang at times the melody, but it had an essentially rhythmic and danceable role. Only the violin was showcased in an extremely delicate way, on a brief solo or on a counter melody. Continue reading.

Listen and buy:

Download Argentine Tango music fro iTunes Listen on Spotify

We have lots more music and history.

Roberto Rufino. Argentine music at Escuela de Tango de Buenos Aires.

“En un beso la vida” by Carlos Di Sarli y su Orquesta Típica with Roberto Rufino, 1940.

Roberto Rufino. Argentine music at Escuela de Tango de Buenos Aires.Roberto Rufino

Singer and composer

(6 January 1922 – 24 February 1999)

Listening to Roberto Rufino when he sang “María” or “La novia ausente” or “Malena” or any of the tangos he had chosen for his repertoire, was to realize that that tango was unraveling little by little and that the words sprang up separately, without forsaking the whole that gathered them, with the proper strength they had to have in their context.

Rufino was that: a storyteller, a phraser, an interpreter that perfectly knew which was the meaning of what he was singing.

He was born on January 6, 1922, on 753 Agüero Street —in the heart of the neighborhood of el Abasto—, son of Lorenzo Rufino and Agustina Guirin, although in his birth certificate is written the day he was filed on the records, on the 8th day of that same month and year. A little bit yonder, on Agüero and Guardia Vieja Streets, the café O’Rondeman was placed, where Carlos Gardel attempted his early songs. A premonition? Maybe, because Rufino as well started at the old café of his neighborhood, which still was run by the Traverso brothers. But there is a further coincidence: in the same year, 1935, his father and Gardel died. And in 1936, a few days after the cortege which was mourning Carlitos to his final abode had passed along Corrientes street, El pibe del Abasto —as he was called since the early days at O’Rondeman, made his professional debut; he was also called El pibe Terremoto— at the Café El Nacional, as vocalist of the Francisco Rosse typical orchestra, to switch, a little bit later, to Petit Salón, with Antonio Bonavena orchestra, composer of “Pájaro ciego” and uncle of the would-be boxer.

But we are still in the singer’s prehistory. Continue reading at www.todotango.com...

Listen and buy:
Download Argentine Tango music fro iTunes Listen on Spotify
We have lots more music and history…
Champagne Tango. Argentine music at Escuela de Tango de Buenos Aires.

“Champagne Tango” by Carlos Di Sarli y su Orquesta Típica, 1958.

Argentine Tango dance classes at Escuela de Tango de Buenos Aires with Marcelo SolisManuel Aróztegui

Pianist and composer

(4 January 1888 – 14 November 1938)

He was an Oriental (Uruguayan) born in Montevideo on January 4, 1888. This is the exact date given by his nephew Bernardo, a pianist, who, besides exhibiting documents, stated that the right spelling of the family name is with “z” and not with “s”. As we found a certain generalized confusion about that, we think we have cleared out the issue.

Héctor Bates and Luis Bates (in La Historia del Tango) mention bibliographic references of the composer we are talking about. We include a summary of them:

«He was a little above one year old when he settled in Buenos Aires with his family. He studied up to third degree in grammar school, because he admitted he used to play truant. He carried out varied trades.

«His devotion for music was born after he heard Pacho who, by that time (1905), played at a café placed on Thames and Guayanas (now Niceto Vega).

«In his spare time he devoted himself to learn music: guitar, mandolin and violin. Finally he chose piano; his first lessons were taught by a hatter named Leopoldo, later he continued with Carlos Hernani Macchi. Continue reading at www.todotango.com...

Listen and buy:

Download Argentine Tango music fro iTunes Listen on Spotify

We have lots more music and history.

%d bloggers like this: