Osvaldo Pugliese. Argentine Tango music at Escuela de Tango de Buenos Aires.

“La Yumba” by Osvaldo Pugliese y su Orquesta Típica, 1946.

“La Yumba” by Osvaldo Pugliese y su Orquesta Típica, 1946.

Osvaldo Pugliese playing the piano.

Osvaldo Pugliese

Pianist, leader, composer. (2 December 1905 – 25 July 1995)

In the 40s Pugliese recorded some instrumental pieces of his own which anticipated the avant-garde.

Such is the case of “La yumba” (which became a sort of anthem of his orchestra).

Through years, Osvaldo Pugliese orchestra was banned for broadcasting as a means of political censorship but it did not succeed in diminishing his popular acceptance.

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Agustín Bardi composed "El rodeo" in 1913.

“El rodeo” by Osvaldo Pugliese y su Orquesta Típica, 1943.

“El rodeo” by Osvaldo Pugliese y su Orquesta Típica, 1943.

Agustín Bardi

Violinist, pianist and composer (13 August 1884 – 21 April 1941)

Having disconnected from Arolas, in 1916, he went on to play at the Avellaneda’s Paris cinema, which was a precursor to having orchestras for silent films, with a trio completed by Graciano de Leone on bandoneon and violinist Eduardo Monelos.

There, Bardi incorporated the tangos “El jagüel” and “Cordón de oro” into his repertoire, composed by Carlos Posadas — the composer he most admired —

and made his own, “El rodeo”, known.

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"Derecho viejo" of Eduardo Arolas. History of Tango by Marcelo Solis. Escuela de Tango de Buenos Aires.

“Derecho viejo” by Osvaldo Pugliese y su Orquesta Típica, 1945.

“Derecho viejo” by Osvaldo Pugliese y su Orquesta Típica, 1945.

Eduardo Arolas

Bandoneonist, composer and leader (24 February 1892 – 29 September 1924)

Between 1913 and 1916, his musical composition and production showed evident improvement due to his musical studies, and the achieved experience of his profession.

He consolidated his fame, taking his orchestra to the level of the most prominent ones, leaving the neighborhood cafés, playing on Corrientes Street and at the luxurious places of Palermo neighborhood, in the interior of Argentina, and in Montevideo.

Some of the compositions of this period, among many that have today been forgotten are “Derecho viejo”-played here by Osvaldo Pugliese y su Orquesta Típica in 1945.

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Emilio Balcarce. Argentine music at Escuela de tango de Buenos Aires.

“Si sos brujo” by Osvaldo Pugliese y su Orquesta Típica, 1952.

Emilio Balcarce. Argentine music at Escuela de tango de Buenos Aires.

Emilio Balcarce

Violinist, bandoneonist, bandleader, arranger and composer (22 February 1918 – 19 January 2011)

Enamored with music, his blood is nurtured by the sap of tango and the four-to-the-bar beat circulates in his veins as soon as his fingers caress the strings of his violin and transfer his feeling to the bandoneon keyboard.

He decided to play bandoneon to make it weep or sing influenced by its expressive forcefulness, the sweetness of its nuances and the harmony of its chords.

Playing as second violin for Osvaldo Pugliese —Herrero was the lead violin—, recorded “Si sos brujo” (composed by him). Continue reading at www.todotango.com…

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Osvaldo Pugliese. Argentine Tango music at Escuela de Tango de Buenos Aires.

“La yumba” by Osvaldo Pugliese y su Orquesta Típica, 1952.

Osvaldo Pugliese. Argentine Tango music at Escuela de Tango de Buenos Aires.Osvaldo Pugliese

Pianist, leader, composer.
(2 December 1905 – 25 July 1995)

It was his father who taught him his first music lessons, he started his first steps with violin too, but soon he switched to piano.

In the 40s Pugliese recorded some instrumental pieces of his own which anticipated the avant-garde. Such is the case of “La yumba” (which became a sort of anthem of his orchestra).

Pugliese became the most faithful example of the De Caro style, but with a strong rhythmic beat, very appealing to the dancers but without sacrificing quality. Continue reading at www.todotango.com…

Listen and buy:
Download Argentine Tango music fro iTunes Listen on Spotify
We have lots more music and history…
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