"El olivo", Argentine Tango of Domingo Julio Vivas

“El olivo” by Juan D’Arienzo y su Orquesta Típica with Héctor Mauré in vocals, 1941.

“El olivo” by Juan D’Arienzo y su Orquesta Típica with Héctor Mauré in vocals, 1941.

Domingo Julio Vivas

Guitarist, bandoneonist and composer (12 May 1895 – 15 June 1952)

He played guitar from his childhood, but at age 17, he had the chance to get a bandoneon for a good price and he began to study it.

From this time on, in his long career, he played both instruments.

He accompanied Gardel in 78 recordings.

And before joining his guitar group, the great singer had already recorded Vivas had composed: “El olivo”

Read more about Domingo Julio Vivas at www.todotango.com

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Enrique Maroni. Argentine music at Escuela de Tango de Buenos Aires.

“Cicatrices” by Juan D’Arienzo y su Orquesta Típica with Héctor Mauré in vocals, 1942.

Enrique Maroni, one of the composers of the lyrics of La CumparsitaEnrique Maroni

Lyricist, journalist and theater author
(17 March 1887 – 30 December 1957)

He wrote a hundred lyrics. Gardel committed to record twelve “Cicatrices” among them.

About “La cumparsita”, after its premiere and the immediate recordings by Roberto Firpo, Alonso-Minotto and Juan Maglio, by the time of the sainete’s premiere, did not reach an outstanding place, it was only one more tango. But the circumstance of having a lyric and having been committed to wax by Carlos Gardel that year, brought such a repercussion that no one will deny that it has become the most representative tango of all times.

But the thing is that Maroni, one of the authors, confessed he wasn’t.

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Héctor Mauré. Argentine music at Escuela de Tango de Buenos Aires.

“Amarras” by Juan D’Arienzo y su Orquesta Típica with Héctor Mauré in vocals, 1944.

José Gonzalez Castillo, author of tangos

“Sobre el pucho” by Juan D’Arienzo y su Orquesta Típica with Héctor Mauré in vocals, 1941.

“Sobre el pucho” by Juan D’Arienzo y su Orquesta Típica with Héctor Mauré in vocals, 1941.

José Gonzalez Castillo, author of tangos

José González Castillo

Poet and lyricist (25 January 1885 – 22 October 1937)

Lyrics for tango were born around 1914, based on those ones conceived by Pascual Contursi that year and the following years (“De vuelta al bulín”, “Ivette”, “Flor de fango”, “Mi noche triste (Lita)”), and they were growing strong very slowly.

So much so that in Carlos Gardel’s repertoire tangos were, until the next decade, a rare bird. There was not even a notion of how to sing a tango, a standard that Gardel was gradually establishing after 1922.

That was, precisely, the year José González Castillo truly disembarked in the genre with the lyrics of “Sobre el pucho”, after Sebastián Piana’s music, which was introduced at the talent contest organized by Tango cigarettes.

José Gobello (Crónica general del tango, Editorial Fraterna) stated about this work that, with it «some novelties broke into tango that the tango literary work of Homero Manzi would later turn into true constants. By the way, Pompeya («Un callejón en Pompeya/y un farolito plateando el fango…»); later, the description of the neighborhood and, soon, the enumeration as a descriptive procedure».

But in those lyrics there is something else, metaphor, that springs up in the memory that the malevo devotes to his lost love «…tu inconstancia loca/me arrebató de tu boca/como pucho que se tira/ cuando ya/ni sabor ni aroma da». It is clear that González Castillo was a forerunner, and also that other later lyricists were who deepened those trends.

Read more about José González Castillo at www.todotango.com

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Héctor Mauré. Argentine music at Escuela de Tango de Buenos Aires.

“Tango Brujo” by Juan D’Arienzo y su Orquesta Típica with Héctor Mauré, 1943 (English translation of the lyrics).

Argentine Tango dance classes for beginners, intermediate and advanced level. Argentine Tango dance Private lessons. one to one Argentine dance lessons. Argentine Tango dance lessons for couples. Argentine Tango Milongas and workshops. San Francisco, Lafayette, Walnut Creek, Orinda, Danville, San Jose, Cupertino, Campbell, Mountain View, Sunnyvale, Milpitas. With Marcelo Solis at Escuela de Tango de Buenos Aires.“Tango que sos un encanto
De quien escucha tus sones,
Tango que atraes corazones,
Con tus dulces cantos
Y tus bandoneones.
Sos de cuna humilde,
Y has paseado el universo,
Sin más protocolo,
Que tu música y tus versos,
Para abrirte paso
Has tenido que ser brujo,
Por tus propios medios
Lograste tu triunfo.
Tango que sos un encanto,
Hoy vive tu canto,
En mi corazón.

¡Tango!, ¡Tango!
Tango bravo, tango lindo,
Tango noble, tango guapo
Tango hermano
De mis largas noches tristes,
Compañero de mi pobre corazón.
Tango bravo, fascinante,
¡Tango brujo!,
Tango bravo, combatido,
Tango bravo,
Tango gaucho
Que a pesar de tanta contra
Defendiste con altura,
Tu bravura de varón.”

“Tango you are an enchanter
Of those who listen your sounds,
Tango you attract hearts,
with your sweet songs
and your bandoneons.

You have humble origins
And traveled the universe
without more attributes
other than your music and your verses.
To open your path
you had to be a sorcerer
with your own resources
you achieved success.
Tango you are an enchantment,
today your song lives
in my heart.

Sorcerer Tango!
Brave Tango, Beautiful Tango!,
Noble tango, courageous Tango!
Brother Tango
Of my long sad nights,
mate of my barren heart.

Fascinating courageous Tango!
Sorcerer Tango!
Brave Tango, Opposed,
Brave Tango!
Gaucho Tango,
that despite the odds against you,
with loftiness you defend your manly bravery.”

Music and lyrics: Francisco Canaro.

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