Aníbal Troilo, as a boy. Argentine Tango musician, leader and composer.

“Total pa’qué sirvo” by Aníbal Troilo y su Orquesta Típica with Francisco Fiorentino in vocals, 1941.

“Total pa’qué sirvo” by Aníbal Troilo y su Orquesta Típica with Francisco Fiorentino in vocals, 1941.

Aníbal Troilo, as a boy. Argentine Tango musician, leader and composer.

Aníbal Troilo

Bandoneon player, leader and composer. (11 July 1914 – 19 May 1975)

He was spellbound by the bandoneon when he heard its sound at cafés in his neighborhood.

He was ten when he persuaded his mother into buying one for him.

His first encounter with an audience was when he was eleven, on a stage near El Abasto, a noisy market of fruit and vegetables, today transformed into a shopping-center.

In 1941 he started recording with his emblematic singer, Francisco Fiorentino.

As composer, Troilo contributed an extensive number of major works. Among them: “Total pa’qué sirvo”.

Read more about Aníbal Troilo at www.todotango.com

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Don Juan, Argentine Tango music sheet cover.

“Don Juan” by Carlos Di Sarli y su Orquesta Típica, 1941.

“Don Juan” by Carlos Di Sarli y su Orquesta Típica, 1941.

Don Juan, Argentine Tango music sheet cover.

Ernesto Ponzio

Violinist and composer (10 July 1885 – 21 October 1934)

The well-known tango “Don Juan (El taita del barrio)” was, apparently, written in 1898.

We also know that its 2nd edition bears a lyric written by Ricardo J. Podestá.

According to different authors it was premiered at the dancehall run by Concepción Amaya, Mamita, Lavalle 2177, around 1900.

It was enthusiastically aired either at the J. Hansen’s restaurant (Sarmiento Ave.) or at the Casares kiosk.

Read more about Ernesto Ponzio at www.todotango.com

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9 de julio. Argentine music at Escuela de Tango de Buenos Aires.

“Nueve de Julio” by Juan D’Arienzo y su Orquesta Típica, 1935.

9 de julio. Argentine music at Escuela de Tango de Buenos Aires.José Luis Padula

Guitarist, pianist, composer and leader
(30 October 1893 – 12 June 1945)

This musician son of immigrants, born in the northern province of Tucumán, delved into tango and folk music. His father was Italian, he transferred to him his inclination for music.

As a child he played harmonica and guitar. Unfortunately he became an orphan at age 12 and he didn’t have the support of his mother. About her very little is known. For that reason, being still very young, he went out to the streets to work for his living.

He had the idea of attaching his harmonica to the guitar. He fixed it to a stick fastened by a belt to the upper part of the instrument and so it reached his mouth.

The curiosity that such a combination woke up in people, added to his musical intuition and his facility for melody, allowed him to travel throughout his province and other neighboring places until arriving in Rosario city, in the province of Santa Fe. Continue reading at www.todotango.com...

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Juan Larenza, Argentine Tango musician and composer.

“Para qué te quiero tanto” by Carlos Di Sarli y su Orquesta Típica with Jorge Durán in vocals, 1946.

“Para qué te quiero tanto” by Carlos Di Sarli y su Orquesta Típica with Jorge Durán in vocals, 1946.

Juan Larenza, Argentine Tango musician and composer.

Juan Larenza

Pianist and composer (8 July 1911 – 17 February 1980)

Inspired and prolific composer, he was born in Buenos Aires City.

On his fourteenth birthday his parents surprised him with the gift of a piano.

Even though a cousin of his volunteered to teach him his early exercises he was an intuitive musician and had no need of teachings.

He was self-taught and also in composing.

Among his many compositions we can mention “Para qué te quiero tanto”, with lyrics written by Cátulo Castillo.

Read more about Juan Larenza at www.todotango.com

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Charlo, Argentine Tango singer and composer.

“Rondando tu esquina” by Ángel D’Agostino y su Orquesta Típica with Ángel Vargas in vocals, 1945.

“Rondando tu esquina” by Ángel D’Agostino y su Orquesta Típica with Ángel Vargas in vocals, 1945.

Charlo, Argentine Tango singer and composer.

Charlo

Singer, musician, pianist, actor and composer. (7 July 1906 – 30 October 1990)

In 1928, his profuse presence on record for the label Odeon began not only with Francisco Canaro‘s or Francisco Lomuto’s orchestras —both very popular—,but also with guitars. In his abundant discography with Canaro (more than half a thousand songs until 1931) singer and orchestra alternate protagonism.

From his important work as composer, of rare ability to musically express human drama and romantic rapture, “Rondando tu esquina”, with lyrics by Enrique Cadícamo, stands out.

 

Read more about Charlo at www.todotango.com

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